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What’s the difference between these two sentences? I read both in a dictionary and I’m confused.

She wasn’t used to him away but she soon got used to it. Now she is used to seeing him once in a year.
She didn’t use to him away but she soon got used to it. Now she is used to seeing him once in a year.

The point is that I believe to understand that “She used to” is a past tense, so “She didn’t use to…” is the negative form of this past tense. Now, “She’s used to” is a present tense, so the negative form of this present tense is “She isn’t used to…”. Now, “She wasn’t used to…” sounds to me like a negative (another?) form of the past tense. Is that correct? In above sentences the use of past forms “wasn’t” and “didn’t” tends to confuse, I believe, to a not English speaker, and to think that both are different forms of the past.
Did you use to play tennis when you were younger? (Past, right?)
Are you used to play tennis? (Present, right?)
I don’t know if I’m being clear in explaining my confusion.

Dear Mister Micawber and MrPedantic thank you for your help with my post “Please, help!!”. Mister Micawber, your advice related to the title of that post (“Please, help!!) is important to me. The fact is that I’m a native Spanish speaker and I’m certainly learning the real spoken English in streets and with all of you in EnglishForward; I mean, in Spanish “Please, help!!” doesn’t implies necessarily a panic situation. We’re used to use many exclamation marks. So, I’m sorry. And I would like to thank CalifJim and Clive for their help with my recent post “Needless / unnecessary”.
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Comments  
'Used to' has two meanings.

It also means 'accustomed to'.

So, She is used to him being away - she is accustomed to him being away (from home?).
i dont understand yet plz can you understand me
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Dear nona the brit,
Thank you, but I feel you didn't answer to my question, did you? I mean, the difference between that two sentences. I knew what you have explained to me.
She wasn’t used to him away but she soon got used to it.
She was not accustomed to him (being) away but she soon got accustomed to it.

Now she is used to seeing him once in a year.
Now she is accustomed to seeing him once a year.

Notice that a form of 'to be' appears between She and used when it has this meaning.
Aadan,
Unfortunately I don't understand your reply. What's the meaning of "plz"?
Try out our live chat room.
Plz is a very informal shortening of please.

She wasn’t used to him away but she soon got used to it. Now she is used to seeing him once in a year.
This makes sense as explained.
She didn’t use to him away but she soon got used to it. Now she is used to seeing him once in a year.
She didn't use to him away makes no sense.
Something is wrong with that second sentence.

That aside, here are the expressions you are trying to disambiguate:
_______________
Habit, repeated action:

I go to the movies. I don't go to the movies. (present) [voy / suelo ...]
I used to go to the movies. I didn't use to go to the movies. (past) [iba / solía ...]

Note: NO -ing form after "use(d) to". "use", not "used", in the past negative.
_______________
Familiarity, comfort:

I'm used to drinking wine. I'm not used to drinking wine. (present) [estoy acostumbrado]
I was used to drinking wine. I wasn't used to drinking wine. (past) [estaba acostumbrado]

Note: -ING form after "used to". Never "use", always "used".
_______________
There is another.
To utilize (a tool):

This hammer is used to pound nails. This hammer isn't used to pound nails.
This hammer was used to pound nails. This hammer wasn't used to pound nails.

Note: NO -ing form. Always "used", not "use". In this case, "used to" means "utilized for the purpose of".
___________

Hope this helps.

Emotion: smile
Hi CalifJim,
Thank you. But what about questions:

Did you use to go to the movies? (Is that right?)
Didn't you use to go to the movies? (Is that right?)

Was you used to drinking wine? (Is that right?)
Wasn't you used to drinking wine? (Is that right?)

Now, you said that "I used to go to the movies" and "I was used to drinking wine" are forms of the past. Then, what's the difference between the following two sentences?
I used to smoke.
I was used to smoking.

And again thank you in advance. Muchísimas gracias, amigo.
Eladio
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