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Which is correct--

Sherry and I at the concert.

Sherry and me at the concert.
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The "I/me rule" is to remove "Sherry and" and use the pronoun that still works.
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AnonymousYour examples are sentences, whereas in the original post are phrases and this make the difference.

GG is not 'wrong again', as you put it. It's precisely because they are phrases that it's impossible to tell which case to use, which is what GG meant by referring to the lack of context. Either case could be correct, so GG's posts were spot-on.

BillJ
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What is the context? Either could be right.
That's pretty much the context, just couldn't remember the I/me rule.
Hi,

I disagree with grammargeek.

The personal pronoun 'me' is in the objective case and can be used as na object of the verb or preposition . 'And' is a conjunction and the only correct usage of the personal pronoun after it ('and') is in the subjective case, so that the noun phrase used here, for example as a caption under the photo, must be :

Sherry and I at the concert.
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AnonymousHi,

I disagree with grammargeek.

The personal pronoun 'me' is in the objective case and can be used as na object of the verb or preposition . 'And' is a conjunction and the only correct usage of the personal pronoun after it ('and') is in the subjective case, so that the noun phrase used here, for example as a caption under the photo, must be :
Sherry and I at the concert.
The part of your response that I have put into bold above is completely untrue.

He sang his hit song directly to Sherry and me at the concert.
She ran into Sherry and me at the concert.
I love this picture of Sherry and me at the concert.
 BarbaraPA's reply was promoted to an answer.
Sorry grammar geek, you are wrong again. Your examples are sentences, whereas in the original post are phrases and this make the difference. By the way, the objective 'me' in your examples is absolutely in place and correct because it follows prepositions: 'He sang to Sherry and (to) me'; 'She ran into Sherry and (into) me'; 'I love this picture of Sherry and (of) me at the concert'.
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 BillJ's reply was promoted to an answer.
Ok. I agree that we disagree.
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