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I was born in the sticks but grew up in a big town.

I presume that "born in the sticks" in the above refers to "born in the countryside," but what does "sticks" in the phrase mean?
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AngliholicI was born in the sticks but grew up in a big town.

I presume that "born in the sticks" in the above refers to "born in the countryside," but what does "sticks" in the phrase mean?
Hi,

Not the countryside, but in the 'woods', 'forest', 'wild'. (i.e., away from the conveniences / luxuries of a modern society).
"Out in the sticks" refers generally to any remote rural area. It doesn't literally mean you were born in the woods Emotion: smile
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Delmobile"Out in the sticks" refers generally to any remote rural area. It doesn't literally mean you were born in the woods Emotion: smile
I agree - "born in the woods" does not mean literally ""born in the woods" Emotion: smile (away from the conveniences / luxuries of a modern society).
Anyway, stick is a relative of wood though, right?
Yes, sticks are made of wood - you might say they are a branch of the family tree Emotion: smile

I just wanted to make sure Angliholic knew this is only a figure of speech. If I say, "I grew up in the woods," it really does mean that I grew up in the woods. Maybe my father worked for the forestry service. But "I grew up in the sticks" could mean any small rural town.
Delmobile If I say, "I grew up in the woods," it really does mean that I grew up in the woods. Maybe my father worked for the forestry service. But "I grew up in the sticks" could mean any small rural town.
Delmobile, I would guess that your father was Robin Hood and you grew upin Sherwood Forest! Emotion: big smile

Seriously, is my sentence correct? Would it be better if I write 'I would guess that your father was Robin Hood and you had grown up in Sherwood Forest! If so, why?

Thanks!
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Just to clarify that the phrase is 'in the sticks' and not 'in the woods' and it refers to any rural area not just woodland!
Nemessos, I like "you grew up" better than "you had grown up;" there's no need to use past perfect in that sentence.

Nona, is "in the sticks" used in BE? It sounds so American to me. But then so does the somewhat similar and related eloquent phrase "B.F. Egypt," and I think you guys actually invented that one; am I right?
The previous post was me - I keep getting bumped off.

--Del
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