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There has been some recent debate on the letter pages of a paper here in London about the verb usage in the sentence "I was stood at the bus stop".

I say debate, but really there has been none, since everyone who has written in has equally deplored this usage.

I disagree.

I think it might be acceptable in a certain context and with certain things understood.

I've forgotten the correct order in which to parse a verb, but I think this could be the first person, passive, past historic.

Like, for example, in this sentence:

"I was situated in the back of the car."

I think the problem arises because the verb "to stand" is often though of as intransitive. The use "to stand something" is often overlooked.

"I stood the vase on the table"

The verb "to situate" is more often used intransitively.

I situated myself at the bus stop" is not often seen, but is correct usage of a transitive verb with the reflexive pronoun.

I was situated at the bus stop" is the more common, and equally correct usage of a participle adjective (past historic?).

I stood myself at the bus stop" is correct usage of the reflexive construction.

"I was stood at the bus stop" therefore, I would argue, is similarly acceptable as a construction using the passive past historic particle, as an adjective.

What are people's thoughts on this?
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Garnett,

I wasn’t going to add to this topic but I just couldn’t stand it.

John was supposed to have a date with Jennifer last night. But she stood him up.

John got stood up.

He stood at the bus stop for a long time.

He placed a vase on the table. Not “situated”.

So you are saying "I stood myself where I could be seen" is bad English?

Yes, to be honest, I think so. Sorry!Emotion: big smile
I'm whispering because I don't want to stir up the hornet's nest again but this is used colloquially in Britain in some regions. It isn't standard though.
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GoodmanGarnett,

I wasn’t going to add to this topic but I just couldn’t stand it.

John was supposed to have a date with Jennifer last night. But she stood him up.

John got stood up.

He stood at the bus stop for a long time.

He placed a vase on the table. Not “situated”.

So you are saying "I stood myself where I could be seen" is bad English?

Yes, to be honest, I think so. Sorry!Emotion: big smile
The problem here is that we need to decide whether we are in pursuit of a "standard" English or "doublegoodplus" English.

The moment you say one can't use "situate" and should use "place" instead you start down the road towards the latter.

"Situate" is perfectly acceptable.

I see how one can be "stood up" but, like I said the first time it was mentioned, used in that verb phrase it has a completely different meaning and construction, so is meaningless in this discussion.

Grammar follows rules. Like in mathematics, there is no room for opinion. I have shown, with evidence, why I think "I was stood" may be correct, based on the verb's usage as a participle adjective.

Don't get me wrong. I'm not angry about the responses. I'm sorry my posts have been interpreted that way. I'd love to see a reasoned reply based on something more than "opinion".
Another example:

"The cardboard lady in a blue-silk skirt, who was stood up against the candlestick to dance, and whom I see on the same branch, was milder, and was beautiful; but I can't say as much for the larger cardboard man, who used to be hung against the wall and pulled by a string; there was a sinister expression in that nose of his; and when he got his legs round his neck (which he very often did), he was ghastly, and not a creature to be alone with." - C Dickens.

Dickens British enough to (sic) anyone?
cardboard lady (seems to me to be made out of cardboard)
the cadaver reference applies
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Marius Hancucardboard lady (seems to me to be made out of cardboard)
the cadaver reference applies

You're falling back on Grammar Geek's "unless you are an inanimate object, other people don't "stand you" somewhere. If you are dead and rigor mortis has set in, I suppose I can prop you somewhere - at the bus stop, if you wish. But at that point, you've really lost the abilty to use the word "I," haven't you?"

Firstly let's hope nobody tries to stand him up against a wall, since we now know that's impossible.

So you and Grammar Geek both agree part of the grammatical consideration necessary when using the transitive verb "to stand" is the requirement that the object be inanimate?

What other similar verbs have this "inanimate" restriction? To situate? To place? To position? To sit? To establish? To install? To set? To put? To locate? To station?

Please, I am keen to know where "GG and Marius's law of inanimation of positioned objects" comes into play. Admit it. You're just making this up as you go along.

Have you anything to back up your claim the verb "to stand" can only have an inanimate object?
Yes, I am inventing everything as I go along. Truly.
Ok. I'm locking this thread as it seems to be degenerating into a slanging match. I've had to delete an inappropriate post already and I don't feel as though the situation is going to improve. There is no need to be rude about people just because their opinion on a rather debatable topic differs to yours.

There have been different opinions expressed. Everyone feel free to go along with whichever one they believe correct.
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