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Do those two grammatical constructions mean the same in some context?

In general, "I wish" means regret about something, but does the "I'd love", along with strong desire, carry the meaning of an improbable, unlikely situation?

E.g:

I wish I could come over to your house (but I have no time, unfortunately)

I'd love to come over to your house (but again, I have no free time for that).

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anonymousDo those two grammatical constructions mean the same

No. Not generally.

anonymousin some context?

Maybe in some context. Now you've posed a riddle.

anonymousdoes the "I'd love", along with strong desire, carry the meaning of an improbable, unlikely situation?

Not necessarily.

— Would you like to come swimming with us?
— I'd love to! Thanks!

I don't see anything improbable or unlikely about that.

anonymous

I wish I could come over to your house (but I have no time, unfortunately)

I'd love to come over to your house (but again, I have no free time for that).

I'd say that it's all the other words in the sentence that make "I wish" and "I'd love" seem to have the same meaning, not so much those words in themselves.

CJ

Comments  
anonymousDo those two grammatical constructions mean the same in some context?

No. "I'd love" might mean you are accepting an invitation to come over. "I wish I could" might mean that you presently aren't allowed to come over. Context and further comment will resolve any ambiguity.

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.

Thank you, CalifJim! And sorry for the delay in response. Now I think I understand.

Well "I'd like/love to" can be a response to someone when they offer you something. But can it be just an imaginary situation when someone doesn't offer anything actually?

Example: my friend sends me a picture of a car he got yesterday. He just boasts about it. But since I've liked that car so much, my response can be something like "oh that's a great one! I'd love to have it, too" or "it looks fast, I'd love to drive it with you", right?

The first one can also carry the meaning "I wish I could buy this car too" - but I cannot because it's expensive and I have no enough money (for now at least).

The second one can be possible, because my friend can response "oh well, I have free time, what if I pick you up and give you a ride?"

anonymous

Example: my friend sends me a picture of a car he got yesterday. He just boasts about it. But since I've liked that car so much, my response can be something like "oh that's a great one! I'd love to have it, too" or "it looks fast, I'd love to drive it with you", right?

The first one can also carry the meaning "I wish I could buy this car too" - but I cannot because it's expensive and I have no enough money (for now at least).

The second one can be possible, because my friend can response "oh well, I have free time, what if I pick you up and give you a ride?"

Correct. Emotion: yes

CJ

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