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(a) I wish I were rich.

(b) I wish I had been rich.

I guess that (a) is used to mean "I am sorry that I am not rich now", referring to the present situation, not past situation.

Sometimes I find native speakers use (a) to mean "I wish I was rich in the past", referring to the past situation.

I'd like to know which is correct native speaker's sense of English....

English grammar books published in Korea by Koreans say that, (a) refers to the present situation, and (b) to the past situation.
Comments  
Yes, your grammar book is correct.
Thanks, Guru....

Now, I reached a conclusion on this isssue.
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Sometimes I find native speakers use (a) to mean "I wish I was rich in the past", referring to the past situation.

I wish I was/were rich.

Sometimes 'was' is used instead of 'were'. It's not wrong, but the preferred verb is 'were'.

Fear of his father couldn't keep Kim Jong Il from Sung Hae Rim. He was completely besotted with her. He was a film buff, passionate about the movies, and she was a beautiful and famous star of North Korean cinema. The two had become "pals," says Sung, through this mutual interest. Meanwhile, the actress saw the match partly as a way to lift political pressure from her own family. Her father was a wealthy South Korean landowner who sympathized with the Communists and moved north. In spite of that sacrifice, he was persecuted in his adopted country as a member of an enemy class. But politics was just one part of the actress's calculations, says Sung. Her sister was genuinely fond of Kim Jong Il and felt sorry for him because he grew up without his own mother.

(a) If it weren't for his father's potential disapproval, Sung Hae Rang believes, (b) the match might have proved much happier. (c) "If circumstances had been different," she wrote in her memoir, (d) "they could've made a great couple." Instead, no one outside a tiny circle knew they were partners until after his father died and was succeeded by Kim.

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Above is an article from Time magazine. http://www.time.com/time/asia/covers/501030630/story.html

In the article, (b), (c), and (d) seems to fit your explanation, but (a) doesn't.

It seems that (a) needs to be changed into "If it had not been for~~~", because it is referring to the past situation.

Could you give some more explanation?

Or, is the sentence simply not correct?

Pructus(a) I wish I were rich.
(b) I wish I had been rich.
English grammar books published in Korea by Koreans say that, (a) refers to the present situation, and (b) to the past situation.
IMO, this is true only if one speaks about the "to be" verb in the 2nd part of the sentences, that about the situation of being rich.

However, the "wish" verb is in the present in both, thus the "want/desire" is present.

You can imagine sentences in which the wish is also in the past:

I wished I had been rich.
I used to wish I had been rich.
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IMO, you can have both:

I wished I became instantly rich right then and there.
I wished I had become rich in the previous years.

Past wish in both.

In the first, you desired to become rich at that very moment in the past, at the moment/time of the wish.

In the 2nd, you desired to have become rich in/during some previous time/interval, leading to the time of the wish.

Similary, you can have, with similar meanings:

I wished I were rich right then and there.
I wished I had been rich in the previous years.

If it were/weren't for

can be used in both present and past times, IMO.

In past times, the existence shown by the were, is not leading to the situation, but is in simultaneity with it.