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I wished to help/to have helped you, but I was busy then.

Which should I use to fit in the above, to help or to have helped? Thanks.
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I wished to help ...
= I had the thought, at that time in the past, that I was going to help you, because I wanted to help you. (No expectation about when the help would be finished.)

I wished to have helped ...
= I had the thought that, by that time in the past, I would already have helped you, because I wanted to (and expected to) have already finished helping you by that time.

I don't know if that helps, but I tried to show the difference. Of the two, people seldom use the second unless there is an important reason to communcate that very special shade of meaning.

CJ
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I might have used "I wish I had helped you," or "I wish I could have helped you." Do those change the meaning too much CJ? They sound less awkward to me.
CalifJimI wished to help ...
= I had the thought, at that time in the past, that I was going to help you, because I wanted to help you. (No expectation about when the help would be finished.)

I wished to have helped ...
= I had the thought that, by that time in the past, I would already have helped you, because I wanted to (and expected to) have already finished helping you by that time.

I don't know if that helps, but I tried to show the difference. Of the two, people seldom use the second unless there is an important reason to communcate that very special shade of meaning.

CJ

Thanks, Jim and Vera.

Do you mean that both are grammatically correct but the first is more commonly used? If so, I agree with you heartily.

Thanks, Vera.I like your versions because they don't cause confusion.