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Hi

One guy is talking about visiting his father in the hospital.

I was coming back from those gigs and sitting next to him. I would draw him in the hospital room, all the wires and tubes. Sometimes I would read to him.

--- I don't understand the second sentence. Could you make it clear to me??? Maybe paraphrase?
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Used to is what is meant by would, here, making sketches of his father and the stuff in the hospital. I'm not sure the first sentence really fits with the second and third, however.
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Hi,

One A guy is talking about visiting his father in the hospital.

I was coming back from those gigs and sitting next to him. I would draw him in the hospital room, all the wires and tubes. Sometimes I would read to him.

Here's how I interpret it.

He was a musician who played in sessions, eg in a bar. Such sessions are commonly called 'gigs' by musicians.

His routine was this.

Come back to the hospital from a gig.

Sit beside his father.

Draw his father. (Apparently he was an artist as well as a musician.)

Read to his father.

His father is in a hospital bed, hooked up to wires and tubes. (Obviously very ill.)

Are there any countries where someone goes to the hospital in a horse-drawn carriage? That seems so unlikely in a western context that I'm afraid it sounds ludicrous.Emotion: smile

Best wishes, Clive

Clive
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Comments  
I suppose the second sentence comes in correlation with the first one.

Maybe the guy meant that he, himself brought his father into the hospital room (on a wheel chair, for example) and also the wires and tubes as part of the medical equipment. The word "gigs" might indicate a scornful attitude (from merriam-webster, one of the meanings is: " a person of odd or grotesque appearance") towards the medical personell, who were not apt to do the job well/fast enough , thus making the guy bring the "wires and tubes" into the room by himself. (this interpretation of the sentence is absolutely wild and unplausible, but this was the first thought that stroke my mind when I saw the sentence Emotion: smile

A different possible presumption:
Another meaning of "gigs" is a horse-carriage, which is also applicable in this sentence. In that case, still, the guy might have meant that he himself did the job of bringing the medical equipment into the room after getting of the carriage (in which he had arrived to the hospital)
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Hi guys. Now I understand. The guy says that he was coming back from the gigs, coming to hospital, sitting next to his father and he was drawing on a piece of paper him and all this medical apparatus (wires and tubes) hooked up to his father.

Thanks guys

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