I am interested in all opinions from all corners of the Anglo-Saxon world on the following:

1. I would have liked to see him.
2. I would like to have seen him.
3. I would have liked to have seen him.

Thank you.
1 2 3 4
Cool BreezeI am interested in all opinions from all corners of the Anglo-Saxon world on the following:

1. I would have liked to see him. I can't make this sound right.
2. I would like to have seen him. Even to this day, I regret that I missed the opportunity. But still, this is a stretch.
3. I would have liked to have seen him. Far and away, this is my preferred phrasing.

Thank you.
Grammar Geek
Cool BreezeI am interested in all opinions from all corners of the Anglo-Saxon world on the following:

1. I would have liked to see him. I can't make this sound right.
2. I would like to have seen him. Even to this day, I regret that I missed the opportunity. But still, this is a stretch.
3. I would have liked to have seen him. Far and away, this is my preferred phrasing.

Thank you.
1. It sounds perfectly fine to me. "I would have eaten an apple (but there wasn't one)."

2. Geek's interpretation is perfect, Not a stretch at all. It's fine.

3. Absolutely disagree. Too much verb!

1 and 2 mean very much the same thing, talking about an action that didn't quite happen in the past.
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Philip "I would have eaten an apple (but there wasn't one)."

But that's not the tense: I would have have liked to eat an apple is parallel. Perhaps it's right, but it sounds wrong to me. You're talking about a time in the past.

3 may have too much verb for your taste, but you're using those verbs to show that both the regret and the missed action were in the past.

By the way, how about the simpler: I regretted not seeing him?
If you just Google them, (which I just don't trust in this case) you'll get--

I would have liked to have seen him. = 946

I would like to have seen him. = 838

I would have liked to see him. = 22,300

No help, I fear.
"I would have liked to see him" sounds fine to me.

But the easiest way to translate what I suppose is the meaning of these sentences is "I wish I had seen him".
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Here are my analyses:

1. "I would have liked to see him."
This sounds wrong because of how the verbs are used. If you look at the phrase "I would have liked..." you will see that this sets the sentence as being (a) conditional and (b) in the past - "would have " = conditional; "liked" = past participle.

So, when you add on "...to see him," the tense has changed. This is why "I would have like to have seen him" sounds much better.

2. "I would like to have seen him."
This sounds better, but has the same tense-changing funkiness that marks the frst sentence. In this case, the phrase "I would like..." sets you up for the present tense, but "...to have seen him" sends you back to the past.

In both cases, the tense switching is the root of any feelings of "wrongness." Pragmatically, if you used either in speech, I suspect no-one would misunderstand.

3. "I would have liked to have seen him.
This is the best of the options because the tense follows through all aspects of the sentence.

Siggy
Here are my analyses:

1. "I would have liked to see him."
This sounds wrong because of how the verbs are used. If you look at the phrase "I would have liked..." you will see that this sets the sentence as being (a) conditional and (b) in the past - "would have " = conditional; "liked" = past participle.

So, when you add on "...to see him," the tense has changed. This is why "I would have like to have seen him" sounds much better.

2. "I would like to have seen him."
This sounds better, but has the same tense-changing funkiness that marks the frst sentence. In this case, the phrase "I would like..." sets you up for the present tense, but "...to have seen him" sends you back to the past.

In both cases, the tense switching is the root of any feelings of "wrongness." Pragmatically, if you used either in speech, I suspect no-one would misunderstand.

3. "I would have liked to have seen him.
This is the best of the options because the tense follows through all aspects of the sentence.

Siggy
Context is the key more than tense consistency.

Example number 1: If I had not been warned that he was a scoundrel, I would have liked seeing/ to see him.

Example number 2: Grammar Geek has already explained the meaning.
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