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The provided line graph represents the amount of three different spreads which were consumed from 1981 to 2007.

Overall, throughout 26 years, there was a downward trend in the amount of butter and margarine while the new spread, appearing after 15 years, saw an upward trend.

As can be seen in the graph, butter had the highest consumption among three spreads with 140 grams in 1981 and it continued rising to 160 grams over 5 years. During this period, the consumption of margarine declined slightly from 90 grams to 80 grams. There was a dramatic decrease in butter popularity from 160 grams to 70 grams next decade; in contrast, margarine consumption started to go up and remain constant at 100 grams. At this time, the low fat and reduced spreads were also available. Between 1996 and 2007, margarine and butter popularity witnessed a downfall; the butter consumption decreased to 50 grams; the margarine consumption decreased to 40 grams. Starting with a really low consumption at 10 grams, low fat and reduced spread speedily uplift its consumption to over 80 grams in 2001. In spite of a mild decline to 70 grams next 6 years, low fat and reduced spread still remained its popularity and had the highest consumption among three spreads.

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This is not a good practice exam. The instructions do not tell us what is plotted, with reasonable accuracy. The poor student has to guess!

For example, one stick of butter is 113 grams. People do not eat more than one stick of butter each day. And typically, they eat much more than that over a year.

The best guess is average weekly consumption, which would be 2-3 pats of spread per day.

A good essay would not make the reader guess as to what is being shown on the graph.



The provided (Do not use "provided", "given" or any other such modifier. These are usually post-position modifiers. They are unnecessary.) line graph represents (wrong word) the amount of three different spreads which were consumed from 1981 to 2007.

(Incorrect expression. That would mean the entire amounts of these items over 26 years. For example, 24,984 tons of butter could be eaten by all the people in a country over that time.


Here is a model opening.

The line graph compares the average weekly per capita consumption of three types of spreads (butter, margarine and low-fat) each year for the period 1981-2007. The units of measurement are grams.

)

Overall, throughout these 26 years, there was a downward trend in the amount of butter and margarine while the new spread, which first became available in 1996, had appearing after 15 years, saw (Spreads cannot see. They have no eyes. You can use the passive voice, with the verb "see". ) an upward trend.

As can be seen in the graph, (Unnecessary verbiage. The reader knows you are looking at a graph. You told them in the first paragraph!) butter had the highest consumption among the three spreads with 140 grams in 1981 and it continued rising to 160 grams over the next 5 years. During this period, the consumption of margarine declined slightly from 90 grams to 80 grams. There was a dramatic decrease in the use of butter popularity from 160 grams to 70 grams during the next decade; in contrast, margarine consumption started to go up and remain constant (Which one? Did it increase or stay the same?) at 100 grams. At this time, the low fat and reduced spreads were also available. Between 1996 and 2007, margarine and butter popularity witnessed (Wrong word. People can witness things, margarine cannot.) a downfall; the butter consumption decreased to 50 grams; the margarine consumption decreased to 40 grams. (This is very repetitive. You will lose points.) Starting with a really low consumption at 10 grams, low fat and reduced spread speedily (wrong word) uplift (wrong word) its consumption to over 80 grams in 2001. In spite of a mild decline to 70 grams over the next 6 years, low fat and reduced spread still remained (wrong word) its popularity and had the highest consumption among the three spreads.


The line graph compares the average weekly per capita consumption of three types of spreads (butter, margarine and low-fat) each year for the period 1981-2007. The units of measurement are grams.

Overall, butter had the highest use for the first decade, but it was surpassed by margarine from 1991 to 2006. In 1996, low-fat spreads became available, and its usage surpassed butter around 2000 and margarine around 2001. The period ended with low-fat spreads being consumed the most, followed by butter, and then margarine.

In detail, people ate more of these spreads at the beginning (230 grams) than at the end of the period (160 grams). Initially, butter started at 140 and peaked in 1986 at 160 grams. In 1991, equal amounts of butter and margarine were consumed, at about 100 grams each. From 1991 to the appearance of low-fat spreads in 1996, butter declined by about 30 grams, but margarine remained about the same. In 1996, people began to use low-fat spreads, and its use peaked in 2001 at about 82 grams, the same as margarine. Usage of all three spreads decreased from 2001 to 2007.

Comments  

I have read all my mistakes and your model. I have learnt a lot from all of these. Thank you so much.