Before anyone jumps down my throat, let me clarify that I'm not, in this post, referring to the non-count noun 'ice', meaning frozen water.

Now:
I use 'ices' as a non-count noun, referring to sweet, flavored, frozen water. I call a single stick of this substance 'an ices' (a la 'a coffee', 'a pizza'). My wife, otoh, uses the count noun 'ice' to refer to a single stick of this stuff, and refers to them collectively by the plural 'ices'.
Is this regional?
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I use 'ices' as a non-count noun, referring to sweet, flavored, frozen water. I call a single stick of this substance 'an ices' (a la 'a coffee', 'a pizza').

What's its plural? "iceses"?
My wife, otoh, uses the count noun 'ice' to refer to a single stick of this stuff, and refers to them collectively by the plural 'ices'. Is this regional?

Probably. As a Brit, the use of "ice" makes a bit of sense to me. Though I'd be more inclined to go for a more specific term like "ice lolly".

Got me feeling like one now..
Stewart.

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Yep, I've always known it as "one ice", "two ices", although I rarely say that. At the British seaside you often see establishments selling "teas" and "ices", and I've only ever taken "ices" to be the plural of "ice", as "teas" is the plural of "tea".
Michael, I don't know what you mean when you say you say "an ices" by analogy with "a coffee" and "a pizza", if indeed that was what you meant by your post.
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Before anyone jumps down my throat, let me clarify that I'm not, in this post, referring to the non-count noun ... refer to a single stick of this stuff, and refers to them collectively by the plural 'ices'. Is this regional?

AHD shows for 'ice'- 4. A dessert consisting of sweetened and flavored crushed ice.
There's no separate listing for 'ices'. I've never heard it as 'ices', referring to one.

john
Before anyone jumps down my throat, let me clarify that I'm not, in this post, referring to the non-count noun ... noun 'ice' to refer to a single stick of this stuff, and refers to them collectively by the plural 'ices'.

If you mean ice popsicles, I call it a popsicle.
Not sure if water ice is call "an Italian ice", or "an Italian ices"?
Before anyone jumps down my throat, let me clarify that I'm not, in this post, referring to the non-count noun ... refer to a single stick of this stuff, and refers to them collectively by the plural 'ices'. Is this regional?

This is Crazy Talk! Didn't you say you were from Brooklyn (Fourth Largest City in America)?
There are true Italian ices, and that's one word, "Italian ice", pronounced like "Italianice". This is countable. One Italian ice, two Italian ices. A single Italian ice is one of those little ridged paper cups containing the flavored water-ice thing. "Italian ice" can be shortened to "ice". You can also speak of a "lemon ice", etc. but I believe it is an urban myth that some New York speakers use "lemon ice" generically.
Then you have things like popsicles. You referred to "a single stick of this substance", so if you're thinking of things on sticks, maybe what you have in mind is a popsicle. That's countable. But no one calls these things "ices"! That would just create confusion, since "ice

Then you have things like sorbet and sorbetto, substantively cousin to the Italian ice. That's non-countable.
I have heard some Americans use "ice cream" in countable fashion: "I'm gonna go get an ice cream". This is not permissible in my dialect. That might be regional (I have particularly heard countable "ice cream" used by Eastern Massachusetts residents).
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What's its plural? "iceses"? Probably. As a Brit, the ... to go for a more specific term like "ice lolly".

Yep, I've always known it as "one ice", "two ices", although I rarely say that. At the British seaside you ... "an ices" by analogy with "a coffee" and "a pizza", if indeed that was what you meant by your post.

In BrE, 'an ice' usually means 'an ice-cream' - whether cornet, wafer, tub or whatever. The frozen, flavoured water most commonly on a stick but sometimes in a cardboard tube is 'an ice-lolly' or 'a lolly'. 'An ices' isn't something I've heard (except as a phoneticism for Oxford's other river).

John Dean
Oxford
Areff wrote, in part:
You can also speak of a "lemon ice", etc. but I believe it is an urban myth that some New York speakers use "lemon ice" generically.

I do, but I know it is Wrong. And I'm not from here, really, I guess. (Even though it's the place I've lived the longest... how the hell did that happen?)
I have heard some Americans use "ice cream" in countable fashion: "I'm gonna go get an ice cream". This is not permissible in my dialect. That might be regional (I have particularly heard countable "ice cream" used by Eastern Massachusetts residents).

I might go get an ice cream, but that means I'm going to go get an ice-cream sandwich (oh dear), a Klondike bar, or the like. If I'm buying a container with several servings of ice cream, then I get ice cream (no "an").

SML
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Before anyone jumps down my throat, let me clarify that I'm not, in this post, referring to the non-count noun ... refer to a single stick of this stuff, and refers to them collectively by the plural 'ices'. Is this regional?

I've never heard "an ices". "Ices" means "ice creams, ice lollipops, etc."

Adrian
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