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Elvis Presley's song Are You Lonesome Tonight contains a long spoken part where he says:

'Honey, you lied when you said you loved me
And I had no cause to doubt you.
But I'd rather go on hearing your lies
Than to go on living without you.'

I know song lyrics don't always conform to grammatical rules and that easily explains the to go on living. I would just like to know if native speakers would perhaps use the to-particle in similar situations in everyday conversation as well.

Thank you for your answers.

PS: Frank Sinatra sings on one of his recordings: "... what makes that rain to fall..."
Maybe American singers should take some lessons in grammar?Emotion: smile

Cheers
CB
Comments  
Cool BreezeElvis Presley's song Are You Lonesome Tonight contains a long spoken part where he says:

'Honey, you lied when you said you loved me
And I had no cause to doubt you.
But I'd rather go on hearing your lies
Than to go on living without you.'

I know song lyrics don't always conform to grammatical rules and that easily explains the to go on living. I would just like to know if native speakers would perhaps use the to-particle in similar situations in everyday conversation as well.

Thank you for your answers.

PS: Frank Sinatra sings on one of his recordings: "... what makes that rain to fall..."
Maybe American singers should take some lessons in grammar?Emotion: smile

Cheers
CB
I think we're talking about poetic license here.....making the poetry [to] scan,
Sinatra's use of "to fall" is just an example of an older form. Poetic indeed. No need for grammar lessons there.
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Poetic license, yes, of course, I said that in my post although I didn't use your term. But you didn't answer my question, that's something I do not know the answer to: Do native speakers use to in similar contexts when they speak? For example, would you say something like this:

I would rather see him in person than to send him a card.

Grammarians would of course prefer:
I would rather see him in person than send him a card.

Cheers
CB
<For example, would you say something like this:

I would rather see him in person than to send him a card.>

Nope.

It's a mix up. It could be "I'd prefer to __ than (to) ____. " or what you have suggested above.
I suspect that many native speakers do insert that "to". The googles only relate to written English; but they are numerous:

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=ISO-8859-1&q=%22I+would+rather+*+to%22

(I'll have to listen out for it and report back.)

MrP
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I would quite happily say the to in that context although I'm not sure I always use the to. With or without both seem completely acceptable to me.

I would rather see him in prison than to send him a card. Emotion: smile

CJ