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Hi

I'm wondering why the author of the sentence below used "I'd" and "would've been" instead of just "I imagine" and "were" or "have been"?

I'd imagine that the tasks at the interview would've been a doddle for you.
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It takes the edge off. It softens the message.
I imagine the tasks ... were a doddle for you gives the feeling of "You're pretty stupid, so the tasks probably confused you."
I'd imagine the tasks ... would've been a doddle for you gives the feeling of "You poor, unfortunate guy. I suppose the tasks may possibly have confused you."
The difference is subtle, and my paraphrases may have exaggerated it a bit.
CJ
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I'd imagine is more polite/reserved, there is a difference
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You wrote that the difference is subtle so, actually, there's not much difference between these two?
 Marius Hancu's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Newguestso, actually, there's not much difference between these two?
The tone of voice, in my opinion, can counteract the actual word choice so strongly that the difference between them may be, in some contexts, below the noise level, so to speak.
CJ
Thank you!