Greetings.
I am listening to the audio book Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix read by Stephen Fry. In it, he voices a character named Nymphadora Tonks. The accent he uses for Tonks is one I'm not able to place. Perhaps someone here can help.
The features of the accent which most distinguish it from received pronunciation (RP) are as follows. (I use SAMPA IPA transcriptions here.)

(1) /V/ becomes /U/ and /U/ becomes /u/, as in Scouse

(2) All s are rhotic.
(3) Word-terminal /i:/ becomes /I/
(4) /eI/, /[email protected]/, /@U/ and other "long" vowels are noticeably less diphthongized, sounding more like /e:/, /u:/, and /o:/.

All in all, it sounds rather Liverpudlian to me except for the very distinct rhotic /r/ everywhere.
Regards,
Tristan

V.-o Tristan Miller (en,(fr,de,ia)) >`-' -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= <> In a haiku, so it's hard (7 \\ http://www.nothingisreal.com / >
1 2
Greetings. I am listening to the audio book Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix read by ... Tonks. The accent he uses for Tonks is one I'm not able to place. Perhaps someone here can help.

I've got that audio book, so if you can give me a good chapter number I'll have a listen.
Matti
Greetings. I am listening to the audio book Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix read by ... Nymphadora Tonks. The accent he uses for Tonks is one I'm not able to place. Perhaps someone here can help.

I don't know how good Stephen Fry is at accents, but I'll assume that the accent is authentic.
The features of the accent which most distinguish it from received pronunciation (RP) are as follows. (I use SAMPA IPA transcriptions here.) (1) /V/ becomes /U/ and /U/ becomes /u/, as in Scouse

RP /U/ only becomes Scouse /u/ in words, e.g. "book" (which is usually something like (bu":x) in a strong Scouse accent). This can occur elsewhere in northern England too, though not usually with an (x).
(2) All s are rhotic. (3) Word-terminal /i:/ becomes /I/ (4) /eI/, /[email protected]/, /@U/ and other "long" vowels are noticeably ... /u:/, and /o:/. All in all, it sounds rather Liverpudlian to me except for the very distinct rhotic /r/ everywhere.

(3) and (4) are not really features of Scouse, though they are common elsewhere in the north of England. Scouse tends to use (i) for final (e.g. "happy"), and has surprisingly RP-like diphthongs in "gate" and "goat".
(1), (3) and (4) all tend to suggest northern England. So I'd suggest a rhotic pocket somewhere in the North, such as Accrington in Lancashire, but I don't know why such an accent would be used in this context.
Presumably words like "bath" have a short (a) and not the long (AEmotion: smile of RP; if not that would rule out anything from northern England.

Jonathan
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Greetings.
Greetings. I am listening to the audio book Harry ... not able to place. Perhaps someone here can help.

I've got that audio book, so if you can give me a good chapter number I'll have a listen.

It's Chapter 2, on CD 2. You can hear the Tonks character speak at the following times (where the beginning of the CD is 00:00):

24:31 to 24:50
26:11 to 26:24
27:11 to 27:16
28:22 to 28:43
29:25 to 33:19
I'll post a link to a clip of that last section if I can figure out how.

Regards,
Tristan

V.-o Tristan Miller (en,(fr,de,ia)) >`-' -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= <> In a haiku, so it's hard (7 \\ http://www.nothingisreal.com / >
Greetings.
I am listening to the audio book Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix read by Stephen ... Nymphadora Tonks. The accent he uses for Tonks is one I'm not able to place. Perhaps someone here can help.

I've put a short clip of the audio book in question up at the following URL. It's about four minutes long and contains most of the Tonks dialogue.

Regards,
Tristan

V.-o Tristan Miller (en,(fr,de,ia)) >`-' -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= <> In a haiku, so it's hard (7 \\ http://www.nothingisreal.com / >
Ar an t-ochtú lá déag de mí Feabhra, scríobh Tristan Miller:
I am listening to the audio book Harry Potter ... I'm not able to place. Perhaps someone here can help.

I've put a short clip of the audio book in question up at the following URL. It's about four minutes long and contains most of the Tonks dialogue.

Nothing I’ve ever heard before, and I’d be surprised if he was aiming for an existing accent. Someone else’s “pocket-of-rhoticism-in-the-north-of England” comment about describes where I would place it, if I did believe it were an existing accent.

“Ah come on now Ted, a Volkswagen with a mind of its own, driving all over the place and going mad, if that’s not scary I don’t know what is.”
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I've got that audio book, so if you can give me a good chapter number I'll have a listen.

It's Chapter 2, on CD 2. You can hear the Tonks character speak at the following times (where the beginning of the CD is 00:00): 24:31 to 24:50 26:11 to 26:24 27:11 to 27:16 28:22 to 28:43 29:25 to 33:19

It's actually Chapter 3, and I've now listened to most of the Tonks utterances. They started off as Rochdale, then wandered off around Bolton and Bury for a while. Then we crossed the Pennines for some Giggleswick, and the unexpected rhoticism of Dorset set in. Later on there were some distinctly southern vowels short "broom", for example. So it's one of Fry's peripatetic accents, with nods to Gracie Fields, Fred Dibnah, Alan Bennett and the Wurzels. No Liverpudlians were injured, however.
Matti
Greetings.
I've put a short clip of the audio book in ... minutes long and contains most of the Tonks dialogue.

Nothing I’ve ever heard before, and I’d be surprised if he was aiming for an existing accent.

Well, he voices other characters with passable approximations of existing accents, so I was assuming that he isn't making this one up. If it weren't for the Scousey vowel shifts, I might have thought he was trying to impersonate an American.
Could the accent be from somewhere in Lancashire? IIRC some of their accents are rhotic, and their proximity to Merseyside might explain the vowel treatment.
Regards,
Tristan

V.-o Tristan Miller (en,(fr,de,ia)) >`-' -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= <> In a haiku, so it's hard (7 \\ http://www.nothingisreal.com / >
It's actually Chapter 3, and I've now listened to most of the Tonks utterances. They started off as Rochdale, then ... Fry's peripatetic accents, with nods to Gracie Fields, Fred Dibnah, Alan Bennett and the Wurzels. No Liverpudlians were injured, however.

In other words, it's as genuine as Martin Short's accent in "Father of the Bride".

I believe in traditional marriage. It'll cost you five talents of gold and a camel to marry my daughter.
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