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Hi.

I wanted to know the definitions of basic things regarding syntax.
I hope this is the right place to post this(I think it is).

A clause is a part of a sentence having its own subject and predicate, right?
In a sentence, which is a grammatical unit composed of one or more clauses, there are clauses and phrases, right?
And phrases are syntactic structures consisting of more than one word but lacking the subject-predicate structure of a clause, right?

So: Sentence > Clause > Phrase

Please make corrections if anything is wrong or not enough clear.

How can I identify a clause in a sentence?

For example, in short sentences like these: 'I like swimming' and 'Swimming is fun'.
                                                              ^  ^       ^                     ^          ^     ^
                                                      Subject Verb Object              Subject  Verb Object(I think)
                                                      Subject    Predicate               Subject   Predicate

I can't identify where is the clause in these. It seems that the sentence and the clause are the same in these cases.
And as for phrases, how can I identify them?

In bigger sentences: 'I want to die, but not now'.
How can I make the syntactical analysis of this sentence?
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You are on the right track!

Some sentences have only one clause, as you have pointed out in the examples.

Sentence with two main clauses:

My mother works at the post office and my father stays home.

Sentence with one main clause and one dependant clause:

Because my mother works at the post office, my father must stay at home with the kids.

(the highlighted part is a phrase)
Comments  
I didn't mean to post this twice. Sorry.
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 Philip's reply was promoted to an answer.
Because my mother works at the post office
Ok. So this is the dependent clause, right?
my father must stay at home with the kids
And this is the independent clause, right?

You said that 'with the kids' is a phrase.
How can I tell that this is a phrase?

As for this one: 'My mother works at the post office and my father stays home'.
My mother works at the post office and and my father stays home
These are both independent clauses right?
Shouldn't there be a comma then?
Like this: My mother works at the post office, and my father stays home.
FerbeBecause my mother works at the post office

Ok. So this is the dependent clause, right?

my father must stay at home with the kids

And this is the independent clause, right?

You said that 'with the kids' is a phrase.

How can I tell that this is a phrase?

As for this one: 'My mother works at the post office and my father stays home'.

My mother works at the post office and and my father stays home

These are both independent clauses right?

Shouldn't there be a comma then?

Like this: My mother works at the post office, and my father stays home.

Correct.

Type "phrases" in the search bar for extensive discussions.

Good catch! I omitted the necessary comma.

Have a colorful day!

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