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i have to identify direct objects, indirect objects, subject complements, and object complements...

1. A naturalist gave us a short lecture on the Cascade Mountains.
2. He showed slides of mountain lakes and heather meadows.
3. Douglas fir predominates in the Cascade forests.
4. Mountaineers and artists have long considered the North Cascades the most dramatic mountains of the range.
5. Timberlines are low because of the short growing season.
6. Mt. Rainier is the highest volcano in the range.
7. The waxing and waning of the glaciers have eroded the mountain walls.
8. Hikers to this area should pack warm clothing.
9. My friend lent me his map of the Pacific Crest Trail.
10. The trail begins in southern California and ends in British Columbia.

I can't do it, please help me!!
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If you can't do them then it's obvious that your teacher didn't explain these terms well enough. OR you were sleeping like most students do in grammar class because the material is so inane.

Ask your teacher to help you with a few, then set you on your own again.

What's that famous line kids always ask; "What could this possibly be used for?" or something like that.
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The DO comes after the verb, so look for a noun that comes after the verb. For example,

Pat ate sushi. (DO)

The IO also comes after the verb, but it's part of a pair. If there are two nouns after the verb, then one is the DO and one is the IO. The IO often occurs with a preposition, like "to" or "for", for example:

I gave my book to Max. (IO)
I gave Max my book. (IO)

The SC and comes before a linking verb. Linking verbs don't express an action; they express a state, like this,

I am a teacher. (SC) "am" is a linking verb. It's the verb BE.
The dog looks sad. (SC) "looks" is a linking verb.

The OC comes after the DO, and it tells us about the DO, like this,

They call him Sam. (OC) "Sam" tells us about "him". Test: He is Sam.

Now why don't you try? Once you're done, post your answers and we'll take a look.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Comments  
1. A naturalist gave us a short lecture on the Cascade Mountains. (pattern 5)

S V(t) OI OD AD
2. He showed slides of mountain lakes and heather meadows. (Pattern 3)

S V(t) O
3. Douglas fir predominates in the Cascade forests.

S V(i) AD

Try the rest out yourself.

basically sentences are devided into 5 patterns:

pattern 1:

Subject + Linking verb + subject Complement

pattern 2:

Subject + Verb (intransitive)

Pattern 3:

Subject + Verb (transitive) + object

pattern 4:

Subject + verb (Complext transitive) + object + object complement

Pattern 5

Subject (double transitive) + object (indirect) + object (direct)

And words included within these 5 patterns are: Subject (S), Verb(V), Object (O), Subject complement (SC), Object Complement (OC), Attribute (AT), Adjunct(AD)

good luck with it
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