1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Yes, no, no, no, no, no, yes.
Like "sandwich" in food threads, there are accepted definitions in music. Unless a particular country is specified, or unless the speaker is from somewhere like the Sudan, "trad music" defaults to the Celtic-rooted music of the British Isle.
The "Oy!" is undeserved. "I've a passion for.." is legitimate in my book. Far more legitimate than "Hiberno-Brito-supremacist".
Trad what, Coop? Trad Hiberno-Brito-supremacist music? What are the outer ... it only Hiberno-Brito-supremacist music that qualifies for the "trad" label?

Yes, no, no, no, no, no, yes. Like "sandwich" in food threads, there are accepted definitions in music. Unless a particular country is specified, or unless the speaker is from somewhere like the Sudan, "trad music" defaults to the Celtic-rooted music of the British Isle.

Why, Coop? How can you justify this Celtisupremacism? What in Freck's name is so great about Celtic music, let alone other aspects of Celtic culture? Are Celts some sort of Master Race? I suppose you allow the French in because you accept Breton folk music as "trad"?

(Now see, Matti, that's an example of a correct use of the question mark.)

The assumption seems to be that Brito-Celtic music is somehow normative, that all other musics and musical traditions of the world play second fiddle to it. It reminds me of the chauvinism of people from the San Francisco Bay Area, who like to refer to that area as "The Bay Area", as though there were no other bays in this the USA. I wonder when that got started (= BrE "I wonder when that got started?").

BTW, which isle is the British one?
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Yes, no, no, no, no, no, yes. Like "sandwich" in ... music" defaults to the Celtic-rooted music of the British Isle.

Why, Coop? How can you justify this Celtisupremacism?

I don't need to. "They" do.
What in Freck's name is so great about Celtic music, let alone other aspects of Celtic culture? Are Celts some ... other bays in this the USA. I wonder when that got started (= BrE "I wonder when that got started?").

Yes, well, there you go. Just as a further-unspecified reference to "Manhattan" means New Yawk and not Kansas, "trad" means Celtic-rooted music. If you spell out, or fully pronounce, "traditional", it doesn't have the same meaning. Trad is trad. Now quit bodhran me about this and pipe down.
Why, Coop? How can you justify this Celtisupremacism? What in Freck's name is so great about Celtic music, let alone ... accept Breton folk music as "trad"? (Now see, Matti, that's an example of a correct use of the question mark.)

Its structure is identical to "I wonder whether you allow the French in because you accept Breton folk music as 'trad'?"
Matti...
Bethoven was a fine pianist, at least until his hearing went, and he could improvise as well as the next guy. Musical themes often came to him, as if out of the blue, as he strolled the woods around Vienna. (Cue Strauss Waltz.) But he slaved over the organization of his written compositions. The sketches for the first movement of the Fifth Symphony suggest that every bar was a struggle. The inspiration may have come suddenly, but the working out was painstaking indeed. Beethoven may have predated Edison, but he knew the ingredients of genius, and their ratio.
And while we're at it, Mozart, who was also a great improvisor, was nowhere near the unconscious fount of melody that he is made to seem in Amadeus. He, too, worked hard on his compositions. He was astoundingly facile, but that's part of what made him Mozart. He still couldn't just dash it off, first and final draft the same, no matter what Shaffer's Salieri says. And although much of what Bach has left usm especially the freer organ music, is not much more than transcribed improvisation, his major fugal compositions had to have been painstakingly put together.
I wonder how much time the great jazz performer/composers spent (and continue to spend) on the tunes on which they improvise.

Bob Lieblich
No question mark on that last sentence, TYVM
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I wonder how much time the great jazz performer/composers spent (and continue to spend) on the tunes on which they improvise.

Jazz performance, of course, unlike most symphonic performance, requires both execution and composition, simultaneously.
We do know that two of the greatest improvisors,
Charlie Parker and John Coltrane, were absolutely
fanatical 'practicers', and the evidence suggests that they worked out their innovative harmonic ideas
over hundreds or thousands of hours of "woodshedding". They would then show up on the bandstand and give the appearance of spinning their fabulous flights out of "nothing." I think achieving the kind of fluency that those men, and a few others, had would have taken enormous amounts of time and effort. By comparison, it is said that Duke Ellington a fine composer and a capable though probably not a "great" improvisor, sometimes dashed off a composition in a couple of hours.

Michael West
By comparison, it is said that Duke Ellington a fine composer and a capable though probably not a "great" improvisor, sometimes dashed off a composition in a couple of hours.

Ellington wasn't especially known as a musician, though he had some capability. Sure, he may have been more known as a pianist than, say, Chaim Jacobs (The Unknown Soldier of Israel) was known as a soldier, but that's not saying much. I haven't heard that recording he did with Trane in a long time, but that's a well-loved recording for many. Anywayce (as you Chicagoans say), Billy Strayhorn wrote all of Ellington's important compositions, wot wot?
By comparison, it is said that Duke Ellington a ... sometimes dashed off a composition in a couple of hours.

Ellington wasn't especially known as a musician, though he had some capability. Sure, he may have been more known as ... I haven't heard that recording he did with Trane in a long time, but that's a well-loved recording for many.

Yes, I was walking on eggshells. I've never been that keen on Ellington's piano sound. But he's a god, so one mustn't appear sacrilegious. Strayhorn had a nicer touch mebbe too pretty sometimes.
Anywayce (as you Chicagoans say), Billy Strayhorn wrote all of Ellington's important compositions, wot wot?

Many, certainly, though it must be said that what
Strays did he did with the intent that it sound
like Ellington might have done it. And the two of
them used to joke about not knowing which of them
wrote which bits, though I'll bet they knew perfectly well. Only Strays coulda wrote "Lush Life".

Michael West
You don't mean the Chaim Jacobs Shirley!?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
At the risk of seeming to commercialize this column, I'd like to call your attention to arecent CD which puts ... acoustic chamber ensemble, and frames their improv in a setting that combines classical elements with a jazz sensibility and dynamic.

"Seeming"? Perhaps we could discuss the term
"seeming" in English usage? (I borrowed that
question mark from another thread.)
Anyway, I generally run away from attempts
at mingling "classical" music and "jazz", because
I believe we should be working to get jazz out of
the concert halls and into the back alleys and brothels and speakeasies where it belongs. (Are there "front alleys" in Brooklyn, Aref?)
But recently I heard something on the radio
that really gassed me. It was a string quartet
playing a transcription of a Thelonious Monk
piano solo, with the great jazz bassist Ron Carter holding the whole thing together rhythmically.
What made it work was that every note of it
was either Monk or Ron Carter so that's not
really "mingling" anything. Just a change in
intrumentation.

Michael West
Show more