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(Are there "front alleys" in Brooklyn, Aref?)

There basically are no alleys per se, not as a Chicagoan would understand them. In Chicago there seems to be a regular system of alleys, as though alleys were required to be constructed, or left open, on every block. These alleys are wide, too, wide enough for a truck to drive through, say.

New York has no regular system of alleys. There are, here and there, things that look like the Chicago type of alleys; I'd probably call those "crummy-looking streets in back of buildings" or something like that.

The funny thing is, when I was doing some ProQuest research on "frankfurter sandwiches", I found an article on Coney Island at the turn of the century, and the writer was making fun of how people on (I guess it was 'on' then) Coney Island called every alley a "boulevard". So who knows what people meant by "alley" beeack then.
Chicago seems to be aware of this alley difference wrt New York; they consider it a mark of superiority that New Yorkers put their garbage (= MidWAmE 'trash'?) out in front of their dwellings, while Chicagoans keep their garbage hidden away in the alleys. Two comments: (1) Nothing is really 'hidden' in a Chicago alley, since these are wide thoroughfares, in effect, that you see everywhere; (2) What is it about their garbage that Chicagoans are so ashamed of?
My intuition about what an "alley" is is quite different from the Chicago model. I think of an alley as a much narrower, more baroque sort of passageway, and not necessarily one that a vehicle could drive through either.
And although much of what Bach has left usm especially the freer organ music, is not much more than transcribed improvisation, his major fugal compositions had to have been painstakingly put together.

The man improvised IMPROVISED, for cryin' out loud a SIX PART fugue for Frederic the Great. Or so the story goes, and I for one am not going to be the guy to debunk it. Of course, then he went off and spend an unknown but probably huge amount of time finishing the "Musical Offering", but still.
-=Eric

Come to think of it, there are already a million monkeys on a million typewriters, and Usenet is NOTHING like Shakespeare. Blair Houghton.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
And although much of what Bach has left usm especially ... major fugal compositions had to have been painstakingly put together.

The man improvised IMPROVISED, for cryin' out loud a SIX PART fugue for Frederic the Great.

Well, I wasn't there. But I'll bet he'd been nursing it along until he knew he could do it if he had to.
Or so the story goes, and I for one am not going to be the guy to debunk it. Of course, then he went off and spend an unknown but probably huge amount of time finishing the "Musical Offering", but still.

Listening to Bach is a bit like watching Dr. J or Michael Jordan. When they get going, you can't even begin to guess what's coming next (unless you've seen the film before or, with Bach heard the music), and when it does happen you can't believe what you're seeing, or hearing.
You know damned well they've been practicing it on the sly. That doesn't make it any less amazing.

Bob Lieblich
And who am I to dis JSBach?
Bob Lieblich
And who am I to dis JSBach?
I believe his sons, all 479 of them, thought him a shade old-fashioned!
(OT food for thought. He had, I think, seventeen children; but has not one known living descendant. What do we get instead? a heaving mass of Wagners.)
Mike.
Bob Lieblich And who am I to dis JSBach? I believe his sons, all 479 of them, thought him ... seventeen children; but has not one known living descendant. What do we get instead? a heaving mass of Wagners.)

Or, as the Daily Mirror might put it, "a heaving mass of ***".

Speaking of which, I see from today's papers that the breast-bearing pot-puffing, pill-popping, woad-daubed yoof at this year's Glastonbury Festival are to be treated to the ENO doing the whole third act of The Valkyrie.
Far too retro for me, though. I'll be in the psy-trance tent as usual.

Ross Howard
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breast-bearing

Push! Push! It's a . . . tit!

Ross Howard
The funny thing is, when I was doing some ProQuest research on "frankfurter sandwiches", I found an article on Coney ... was 'on' then) Coney Island called every alley a "boulevard". So who knows what people meant by "alley" beeack then.

Up there in Minnesota they use the term "boulevard" to refer to that strip of grass between the sidewalk and the curb that you can find in many suburban sorts of places. Do they say that around Chicago too?
JM
The funny thing is, when I was doing some ProQuest ... So who knows what people meant by "alley" beeack then.

Up there in Minnesota they use the term "boulevard" to refer to that strip of grass between the sidewalk and the curb that you can find in many suburban sorts of places. Do they say that around Chicago too?

We did this recently. I think the consensus was that in most places it's called "that strip fo grass between the sidewalk/pavement and the curb/kerb".

Ross Howard
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The funny thing is, when I was doing some ProQuest ... So who knows what people meant by "alley" beeack then.

Up there in Minnesota they use the term "boulevard" to refer to that strip of grass between the sidewalk and the curb that you can find in many suburban sorts of places. Do they say that around Chicago too?

How in Freck's name should I know? I stay away from the suburban places in Chicagoland to the extent possible. I actually don't even understand why the suburbs of Chicago exist at all. It's just de-prairified prairie, with no essence of urbanity to mediate the arcticity of the region. It's flat wasteland for miles around. At least in the Northeast the suburbs possess some qualities not often present in the cities, such as hills and things like that. (As for "boulevard", some of Chicago's major commercial streets have signs that proclaim "CHICAGO'S BOULEVARDS" or something like that.)
You'd have to check with Coop. He lived in Lincoln Park in his younger days, but then for some reason he moved into one of those monotonous Chicago suburbs, probably one of the many that have the euphemistic "Grove" in their name. Lincoln Park is a lot like the older parts of Queens, especially Astoria, except that instead of having lots of Greek-from-Greece people it has lots of
Greek-from-frats-at-large-Midwestern-public-universities people. I think Kirsh moved to the suburbs too, which may be where he got his taste for the suburban lifestyle, something that has, no doubt, stood him in good stead over there in the Peninsula, where, after all, the suburban office park and strip mall were both invented.
I've heard quite a few Upper Midwesterners express the notion that once you "heeave kids", as they say, you can no longer live in a non-suburban setting. "I love Chica{u/h}go(1), but not if you heeave kids". I've heard that sentence, in a number of variant forms, expressed by enough Upper Midwesterners to be forced to conclude that it is a peculiarity of Upper Midwestern culture that the notion of "heeaving" kids and not living in a suburb are regarded as incompatible oil 'n' water type things. I don't quite understand, since I grew up in New York City, a city, and I remember there being lots of kids there, so clearly people were living in a city and h(a)ving (though perhaps not "heeaving") kids.

You can sort of see ol' Senator Joe McCarthy, who was nothing if not an Upper Midwesterner, banging the gavel at a HUAC hearing, and demanding of a witness: "Are you, or heeave you ever been, a person who heeas heead kids and lived in a city at the same time?"
Hey Coop, when you moved from Lincoln Park to that Grove prairie suburb place, did that coincide with you(r) "heeaving" kids?

(1)Murray Arnow has noted this before: In Chicago there's an interesting dialectal split between people who use their "caught" vowel in "Chicago" and people who use their "cot" vowel, made a bit more complicated by the frontward shifting of the vowels in question. There's a sort of old-time scary proletarian gruff Chicago accent where they pretty clearly say "Chicaugo", but those who use "ah" seem to greatly outnumber those who use "aw". The former isn't so much Sipowiczic as it is a rougher version of Ackroyd or (at least Jim) Belushi.
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