Isn't there an idiom that more or less means "intuitively"? All I can think of right now is "by eye", but I seem to remember there being a better one.
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Anderew wrote on 27 Apr 2004:
Isn't there an idiom that more or less means "intuitively"? All I can think of right now is "by eye", but I seem to remember there being a better one.

"instinctively"? It might also depend on what you're talking about. Some musicians play "by ear". So how does one describe a cook who uses no recipes?

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Isn't there an idiom that more or less means "intuitively"? All I can think of right now is "by eye", but I seem to remember there being a better one.

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Some musicians play "by ear".

Musicians who play by ear fly by the seat of their pants.

Mike Bandy
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Anderew wrote on 27 Apr 2004:

Isn't there an idiom that more or less means "intuitively"? ... but I seem to remember there being a better one.

"instinctively"? It might also depend on what you're talking about. Some musicians play "by ear". So how does one describe a cook who uses no recipes?

Good.
Recipes are for people who don't know how to cook. "Recipe for disaster" is redundundant.

Lars Eighner finger for geek code (Email Removed) http://www.io.com/~eighner / "The very essence of the creative is its novelty, and hence we have no standard by which to judge it." Carl R. Rogers, On Becoming a Person
Isn't there an idiom that more or less means "intuitively"? All I can think of right now is "by eye", but I seem to remember there being a better one.

All I can think of is doing things "by guess and by gosh," but I don't know if that fits your situation. Maybe that's closer to "trial and error" than what you want.
Do you think that intuition is something inborn, as for animals, or something (unconsciously) acquired through experience? I don't want to start a huge nature-nurture debate, but what you intend by "intuitively" affects what suggestions we'd make.

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Anderew wrote on 27 Apr 2004:

Isn't there an idiom that more or less means "intuitively"? ... but I seem to remember there being a better one.

"instinctively"? It might also depend on what you're talking about. Some musicians play "by ear".

It's an interesting phrase. I wouldn't want
to listen to a musician who didn't use his
ear to guide him; they do exist.
It usually means "learns by listening
rather than by reading", so the phrase
should perhaps be "learns by ear". I'm
not really sure there's an "intuitive"
element involved, though certainly
that's a common (mis?)conception.
Some people are "intuitively" visual
learners, and some are aural.

Michael West
Isn't there an idiom that more or less means "intuitively"? All I can think of right now is "by eye", but I seem to remember there being a better one.

I have a gut feeling that there is.
Isn't there an idiom that more or less means "intuitively"? ... eye", but I seem to remember there being a betterone.

I have a gut feeling that there is.

I can feel it in me waters!
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