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Hi

Up to yesterday, I knew only one meaning of the idiom 'on the trot'--perhaps the American meaning:

on the trot = continuously busy (I've been on the trot all day long.)

Today, in our local newspaper, the idiom was used in its British sense, meaning 'one after the other'.

She won three games on the trot.

Could I request the American and/or British moderators to give their take on this?

Thanks,

Tom

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As a British-Canadian, on the trot to me means consecutively.

eg Out team has won four games on the trot.


on the trot = continuously busy (I've been on the trot all day long.) I haven't heard this. I'd say

eg (I've been on the run all day long.

eg (I've been on the go all day long

Clive

Comments  
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

American: "On the trot" is not an expression and would be an odd thing to hear. It would likely be a mistake for "at a trot".

Thanks, Clive and Anon.

It is very interesting to note that all my life I used 'on the trot' meaning 'very busy'. Apparently the idiom in this sense is as rare as hen's teeth.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/on%20the%20trot

Tom