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Is descendant of an idiom or a verb preposition combination?

GB

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Grammarian-botIs descendant of an idiom or a verb preposition combination?

GB
We are not sure what you mean.
Grammarian-botIs descendant of an idiom or a verb preposition combination?

GB

I am a descendant (noun) of (preposition) Hessian soldiers who came to the colonies to fight for the British during the American Revolution.
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Is descendant of an idiom or a verb preposition combination?
Neither. There is nothing about it that isn't literal, so it isn't an idiom, and there is no verb in it, so it can't be a verb-preposition combination either.

CJ

CalifJim
Is descendant of an idiom or a verb preposition combination?
Neither. There is nothing about it that isn't literal, so it isn't an idiom, and there is no verb in it, so it can't be a verb-preposition combination either.

CJ
Thanks, CJ, for your interpretation; now I see:

Is "descendant of" an idiom or a verb-preposition combination?

CalifJim
Is descendant of an idiom or a verb preposition combination?
Neither. There is nothing about it that isn't literal, so it isn't an idiom, and there is no verb in it, so it can't be a verb-preposition combination either.

CJ
Can you tell me what are idioms and how do we identify them?
I called "descendant of" an idiom because the guys on the the other forum that I go to to prepare for GMAT said it so.
But I know these guys aren't as good as EnglishForward.COM guys. Here is the link to this question.
http://www.scoretop.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=5714&PN=20

GB
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
GB,

Please note that the person who called descendant of an idiom also misspelled descendant! Emotion: smile

In comparing the combinations descendant of and descendant from, it would be correct to say that descendant of is the more idiomatic usage. This does not mean that descendant of is an idiom. Nevertheless, sometimes people say idiom when they mean idiomatic usage. It's just a matter of being in a hurry when responding to a post, I suppose.

An idiom is a group of words which has a meaning that cannot be known simply by knowing the literal meaning of each of the words contained within it. For example, kick the bucket is an idiom which means die. Even if we know what kick means, and we know what bucket means, this is not enough to know that kick the bucket means die.

I think you can see that this is completely different from the problem of choosing the proper preposition for a given noun or verb, which is a matter of idiomatic usage.

CJ
Thanks CJ. Now everything is clear.
GB
What are the functions of "by" and "bus" in the sentence "I came here by bus."? I think their functions are literal, preposition and noun, but one of my colleagues is claiming that "by bus" is to be taken as one, like an diom or something to mean "riding". Who is right, me or my colleague?
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