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Hi, just want to know the difference between an idiom and a proverb. Thanks!!
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From the Cambridge dictionary-

Idiom

a group of words in a fixed order that have a particular meaning that is different from the meanings of each word understood on its own:

Proverb

a short sentence, etc., usually known by many people, stating something commonly experienced or giving advice:
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My2senseFrom the Cambridge dictionary-

Idiom

a group of words in a fixed order that have a particular meaning that is different from the meanings of each word understood on its own:

Proverb

a short sentence, etc., usually known by many people, stating something commonly experienced or giving advice:

It's still a bit vague... But accorcing to these definitions, a proverb must be a SENTENCE while an idiom is just a phrase (a group of words)???
Joey_fiveIt's still a bit vague... But accorcing to these definitions, a proverb must be a SENTENCE while an idiom is just a phrase (a group of words)???
Hello Joey5

You are right. A proverb is a saying such that almost everybody knows and you understand easily what it means. For example "Necessity is the mother of invention" is a proverb.

An idiom is a phrase such that almost nobody knows why it means so. "Kick the bucket" is an idiom to mean "die". Do you understand why it means so? I don't

paco
Hi,

Here's one theory, via Google.

Clive

KICK THE BUCKET - " . . . some etymologists say the phrase comes from . . . Slaughtered hogs, their throats slit, used to be hung by their heels, which were tied to a wooden block and the rope then thrown over a pulley that hoisted the animals up. Because hoisting the block was similar to raising a bucket from a well, the wooden block came to be called a 'bucket,' and the dying struggles of the hogs kicking against this 'bucket' supposedly gave birth to the phrase. There are other theories, however, and this old expression - it may date back to the 16th century - must be marked of unknown origin." From "Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins" by Robert Hendrickson (Facts on File, New York, 1997).
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Thank you, Clive, for the interesting information. By the way I notice you have changed your partner. Sounds like una mujer muy simpatica. Quiero hablar con ella.

paco

Pero ella me hable solamente, porque ella tiene ojos solamente para mí.

Clive
Ok. My question is what is the difference between a saying and a proberb?
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Hi,

what is the difference between a saying and a proverb?

In practice, there's often not much difference.

My Oxford dictionary says this.

proverb - a short pithy saying in general use, held to embody a general truth.

You might like to note that we sometimes introduce a proverb by saying 'As the saying goes, (eg) a rolling stone gathers no moss'.

Clive
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