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Could you please tell me the meaning of these following sentences for me?

1. He was sweeping about in his bad temper.

2. He was in his element.

Thank you.
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To sweep (in this context) = to move along or across with a swift continuous action.

About = a preposition with a missing noun phrase. I interpret this as meaning "about the room".

In his bad temper = should be relatively obvious, but the use of HIS bad temper rather than A bad temper suggests that he has bad tempers quite frequently.

In his element = in a familiar place, somewhere you are very comfortable - except that it doesn't refer to a PHYSICAL place, more a MENTAL space. For example, if you are doing something which you know how to do very well, are happy to do, and enjoy doing, then you would be in your element.

Rommie
ANother day in Paradise. Anyone know what it means?

Thanks
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Thanks for your help, Rommie Emotion: smile

Both of the sentences appeared in the book that I have read recently.
Now I understand what the meaning of these idiomatic expressions.

By the way, our guest have asked another expression in this thread.
I can't get the meaning, either, and I'd like to know what it means.:-S
Would you please help us?

Many thanks in advance!!

Candy
it seems that have another day in paradise = have a nice day. just my guess. plz dont get mad . Anyone could help?
I don't know. "Another day in paradise" is a new one on me.

If it's meant literally, it would mean something like "another day of great things happening to me and my feeling really great".

On the other hand, it could be sarcastic, meaning the exact opposite.

I'd really have to hear it in context to know.

Rommie
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Well, as Valentine's day is just round the corner for some of you. Let's imagine that you are having a wonderful time with somebody very special to you, as you pointed out somebody who makes you feel great, somebody who makes you feel alive, somebody whom you had never imagined could exist, stop... stop... stop. Sorry, it wasn't my intention to get carried away but let's continue, then you could say " Another day in paradise". I sincerely hope you got the right picture. Cheers.
thx, nice n lively explanation
"Another day in paradise." is meant sarcastically. You might use it when you wake up in a bus station and realize you'll probably be there all day.
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