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[nq:2]18. I'll get it straight away.
"Straight away" is a British usage for "right away".

I thought that "straight away" was American usage for "right away". Am I mistaken? We do use "straight away" in Britain, but less commonly than "right away". Are you saying that "straight away" is not used at all in America?

Richard Chambers Leeds UK.
[nq:2]"Straight away" is a British usage for "right away".
I thought that "straight away" was American usage for "right away". Am I mistaken? We do use "straight away" in Britain, but less commonly than "right away". Are you saying that "straight away" is not used at all in America?

Hmm. I'm British, and "straightaway" (one word) is the one I find more commonly used. In fact, "right away" sounds a teensy bit American to me, as John implies.

Matti
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BrE check out = AmE check out, but the British mean only the paying of the bill, handing back the keys, and signing any paperwork. The Americans mean everything to do with the departure, even as far as getting into their car and driving away.

That seems dead wrong to me. "Check out" in a hotel-travel sort of context refers precisely to the things you give for the British understanding. You've checked out (AmE) even before you've left the hotel, and certainly getting into a car and driving away from a hotel you've checked out of wouldn't be spoken of itself as "checking out".

It's true, and I think this may be what you're on about, that when you describe a travel itinerary to someone, checking out is important enough that you might say things like "we check out on Friday and yadda yadda yadda" in order to explain the itinerary, but the "checking out" refers specifically to the formal act of checking out of a hotel.

Coop, I'm right, am I not?
All perfectly OK on the right side of the pond.
What about these idioms? Are them in fashion or out of fashion? 1. Sorry? I beg your pardon? I didn't ... once. 17. Mind the step. 18. I'll get it straight away. 19. Mind your head. 20. Keep out. bye bye

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Also all OK on the right side.
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Einde O'Callaghan ha scritto nel messaggio ... CUT Thank you. And what about these? 1. Keep it under your hat. ... solution. 6. That'll do the trick. You're making a mountain out of a molehill. Thanks a lot Einde bye Franco

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In article , John Lawler (Email Removed) writes
5. You've got the wrong end of the stick.

Another metaphor. Think of picking up a shovel by the flat metal part. There is also a far less savoury purported origin.

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What about these idioms? Are them in fashion or out of fashion? 17. Mind the step. 18. I'll get it straight away. 19. Mind your head.

These three are strictly Hiberno-British. You might catch a Hiberno-Britophile like Tony Cooper using them, but otherwise they aren't used by Americans (this statement is subject to the Truly Donovan Proviso).
Australian actor Simon Baker of CBS's The Guardian plays an American character on that show, but not entirely believably because he looks so Freck and Hiberno-British. (Also, the name "Simon Baker" is probably as Hiberno-British-sounding as "Brad Friedel" is American-sounding.) On one episode he actually said "mind your head", which I thought was really weird since you'd think all the dialogue would have been scripted. I figure he ad-libbed that line and they just let it go through.

But anyway, yes, this use of "mind" is very non-American-sounding, though you can imagine an elite American character using it a half-century ago. There are some fixed phrases in AmE where this survives (e.g. "mind your manners", "mind your own business"). For "mind your head", an American would probably say "watch your head". For "mind the step", AmE would have "watch the step" probably.
For "straight away" (= EstE "strigh' awhy"), Americans will say "right away". This is confusing, because the grunt-word "right" (EstE "roi'") is one of the most commonly used words in post-Suez British English.

Didn't Elvis Costello sing "you better watch your step"? Does that sound non-British? Anyone? Anyone? Lamprhey?
Matti Lamprhey (Email Removed) writes:
"Richard Chambers" (Email Removed) writes...

"John Lawler" (Email Removed) writes I thought that "straight away" ... that "straight away" is not used at all in America?

Hmm. I'm British, and "straightaway" (one word) is the one I find more commonly used. In fact, "right away" sounds a teensy bit American to me, as John implies.

In the US, using "straight away" is marked as British. Everybody understands it, mind you; we're familiar with many British usages. But we tend not to use it.

-John Lawler www.umich.edu/~jlawler Univ of Michigan Linguistics Dept -- "I conceive that words are like money, not the worse for being common, but that it is the stamp of custom alone that gives them circulation or value." -- William Hazlitt 'On Familiar Style' (1821)
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"Straight away" is a British usage for "right away".

I thought that "straight away" was American usage for "right away". Am I mistaken? We do use "straight away" in Britain, but less commonly than "right away". Are you saying that "straight away" is not used at all in America?

Well, the Freck and Manual warns us never to say never in AUE, but I think that's basically right. "Straightaway" (I'll assume it's one word) is extremely non-American. I don't think even a pseudo-Hiberno-Britophile like Tony Cooper, a man who's (= TCE "that's") been known to say "at university" and even "whilst", would say "straightaway". If you're right that British speakers are more likely to say "right away", it's not something that's noticeable.

So, yes, celebrated southern Michiganian linguist John Jacob Lawler is correct.
My guess is that any use of "right away" in Britain is the result of AmE influence.
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