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[nq:1]Einde O'Callaghan ha scritto nel messaggio ... CUT Thank you. And what about these? 1. Keep it under your hat. ... been racking my brains. 5. I think I've hit on a solution. 6. That'll do the trick. All quite current.
Regards, Einde
Thus spake Matti Lamprhey:
I thought that "straight away" was American usage for ... that "straight away" is not used at all in America?

Hmm. I'm British, and "straightaway" (one word) is the one I find more commonly used.

Unfortunately, "straightway" dies the death some time over the last couple of hundred years. I used it most lately today, but the text I used it in is a couple of hundred years old.
In fact, "right away" sounds a teensy bit American to me, as John implies.

He didn't say anything about you. -- Simon R. Hughes
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For "straight away" (= EstE "strigh' awhy"), Americans will say "right away". This is confusing, because the grunt-word "right" (EstE "roi'") is one of the most commonly used words in post-Suez British English.

That confirms my thoughts, although I'd write "straightaway". Perhaps my take on EstE is nonstandard, but your "strigh awhy" comes across more as Sarf Lunnon / Cockney.
Didn't Elvis Costello sing "you better watch your step"? Does that sound non-British? Anyone? Anyone? Lamprhey?

The 'd' sound in "you'd better" is commonly so lightly stressed that it might as well not be there, so it sounds British except from a speaker who's particularly punctilious. But most Brits would be careful not to write it like that, because it looks distinctly American^Wsubstandard. Song lyrix excepted, as usual, where substandard is invariably a desideratum.
Matti
For "straight away" (= EstE "strigh' awhy"), Americans will say ... of the most commonly used words in post-Suez British English.

That confirms my thoughts, although I'd write "straightaway". Perhaps my take on EstE is nonstandard, but your "strigh awhy" comes across more as Sarf Lunnon / Cockney.

Could very well be my own steve-hazy understanding of all that. I see all those London-region accents, excluding stuff like Pre-Suez RP, as points on a continuum, with Traditional Cockney at its most stereotypical at one end and the Post-Falklands Estuary-Tainted RP (PFETRP) at the other. But what do I know, I'm just a trombone player.
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Dave Swindell ha scritto nel messaggio ...
All perfectly OK on the right side of the pond.

What's the right said of the pond?:) UK Or US?:)

Let me know

bye Dave Franco
Richard Chambers ha scritto nel messaggio ... CUT

Thanks a lot Richard

Bye Franco
John Lawler ha scritto nel messaggio ... CUT

Thank you John

bye Franco
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BrE check out = AmE check out, but the British ... as far as getting into their car and driving away.

That seems dead wrong to me. "Check out" in a hotel-travel sort of context refers precisely to the things you ... "checking out" refers specifically to the formal act of checking out of a hotel. Coop, I'm right, am I not?

I'm not Coop, but you are right. Think of the hotel/casino combinations in Vegas. We usually check out by the check-out time, but then hang around for a couple more hours, having a lunch at the buffet and spending a few more dollars at the tables. Only after that is it time to look for transportation away from the place. Checking out does not necessarily mean leaving that instant.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
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