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What's the right said of the pond?:) UK Or US?:) Let me know The right side of the pond is the one on right when you look at a map. The other side is known as the left side - not the wrong side. ;-)

Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
In article , Dio (Email Removed) writes
Dave Swindell ha scritto nel messaggio ...

All perfectly OK on the right side of the pond.

What's the right said of the pond?:) UK Or US?:) Let me know There is only one right side, and ... been lured away to the wrong side. What a wonder it is to be the only ones in step ;-)

-- Dave OSOS#24 (Email Removed) Remove my gerbil for email replies

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John Lawler | uk.culture.language.english,alt.usage.english,it.cultura.linguistica. inglese in
Dio (Email Removed) writes:

What about these idioms? Are them in fashion or out of fashion?

Most of these are not idioms.

Hi everybody!

Please note that the original poster ("Dio") did quite a weird crosspost on both English and Italian newsgroups (*)

As the "Idioms" thread seems to be an English speaking one, I would advise everyone to follow Einde's wise suggestion and follow-up to uk.culture.language.english , or to the sole English newsgroups at least, when replying to that message.

Thank you and sorry for my OT post!

* = it.cultura.linguistica.inglese is an Italian NG where the English language and culture are discussed, and there are posts in both Italian and English.
-- Enrico C
[nq:1]In article , John Lawler (Email Removed) writes
Another metaphor. Think of picking up a shovel by the flat metal part.

There is also a far less savoury purported origin.

Yes, you have that "sweet violets" meaning in UK, also.

I think Lawler was being tactful, just in case someone prints his reply out for students, etc.
Einde O'Callaghan ha scritto nel messaggio ...

What's the right said of the pond?:) UK Or US?:) Let me know

The right side of the pond is the one on right when you look at a map. The other side is known as the left side - not the wrong side. ;-)

That's very funny:)
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Enrico C ...
Please note that the original poster ("Dio") did quite a weird crosspost on both English and Italian newsgroups (*)

You are that Muslim chap who pretend to be Italian.

You're very dangerous. Italians are very glad to talk with English people.
BrE check out = AmE check out, but the British ... even as far asgetting into their car and driving away.

That seems dead wrong to me. "Check out" in a hotel-travel sort of context refers precisely to the things you ... to explain the itinerary, but the "checking out" refers specifically to the formal act of checking out of a hotel.

What I am trying to say, rightly or wrongly, is that the American mind seems to focus on the check out procedure as the significant act on the day of departure. The British mind considers this a mere sub-procedure, little worthy of mention, and focuses instead upon the act of getting into the car and driving away. If perchance you and I were staying in the same hotel tonight, you might be thinking about checking out tomorrow. I would be thinking about my departure tomorrow, or leaving tomorrow, rather than about checking out.
Let us think about everything you need to do to leave a hotel. Pack your case, pay the bill, hand in your keys, put the suitcase into the boot/trunk, and drive away. The general term I would use to describe this entire procedure would be my "departure", reserving the word "check out" for the specific sub-procedure of paying the bill. I believe that an American would often use the term "check out" to describe the full procedure. If I am right, the Americans have generalised the check out, while the Brits have generalised the act of driving off, in order to describe the full procedure.

Richard Chambers Leeds UK.
What I am trying to say, rightly or wrongly, is that the American mind seems to focus on the check ... about checking out tomorrow. I would be thinking about my departure tomorrow, or leaving tomorrow, rather than about checking out.

Okay, so you're saying wrongly. Checking out is a sort of mechanical/bureaucratic procedure. It is becoming increasingly common for hotels to provide "express checkout" procedures to make checking out as painless and as quick as possible.
Let us think about everything you need to do to leave a hotel. Pack your case

That's a British expression. The Baytles used it in "Back in the U.S.S.R." (well, it was "unpack my case").
Americans wouldn't generally shorten "suitcase" to "case".
, pay the bill, hand in your keys, put the suitcase into the boot/trunk, and drive away. The general term ... paying the bill. I believe that an American would often use the term "check out" to describe the full procedure.

That's just completely dead wrong. "Check out" refers only to the formalities involved in leaving the hotel with respect to the hotel management basically, paying the bill, returning the keys, etc.
If I am right, the Americans have generalised the check out, while the Brits have generalised the act of driving off, in order to describe the full procedure.

Do you have any actual evidence of this American generalization of "check out"?
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This is my own observation. In effect, I am simply trying to make sense of what I often see and hear. I sometimes find myself in hotels with American guests, and have noticed that your compatriots use the term "check out" much more frequently than do the British. I don't really know why this should be so, and have proposed the above theory to try to account for it. But if you are telling me that I am misinterpreting American language, I shall have to accept that as a fact, as I believe that you know what you are talking about better than I do on the subject of AmE.
An alternative possible explanation for why Americans use the term "check out" more than the British might be this:- On the day of departure, you will go to the Reception Desk and "check out". I will go to the same desk and "pay the bill". Would you regard this as a credible explanation for why we say "check out" less frequently than the Americans do?

Richard Chambers Leeds UK.
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