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[nq:1]Einde O'Callaghan ha scritto nel messaggio ... CUT Thank you. And what about these? 1. Keep it under your hat.
"Keep it secret." This sounds obsolete to me, an American.
2. We've got to get to the bottom of this.

"We've got to understand why this strange thing is happening." This sounds old-fashioned to me--I'd expect to hear it in a parody of a detective story.
3. I can't figure it out.

"I can't understand it."
4. I've been racking my brains.

"I've been thinking so hard about it that the effort was painful."
5. I think I've hit on a solution.

"I think I've found a solution." There's a tinge of modesty about this, as if finding the solution were an accident.
6. That'll do the trick.

"That will accomplish what I need to accomplish."
You're making a mountain out of a molehill..

"You're treating something as much more important than it is."

-- Jerry Friedman
An alternative possible explanation for why Americans use the term "check out" more than the British might be this:- On ... Would you regard this as a credible explanation for why we say "check out" less frequently than the Americans do?

By Joey, I think you may have got it. While checking out of a hotel, especially in its traditional version, might involve paying the hotel bill, I don't think Americans tend to speak of this as "paying the bill" since "checking out" includes all that. (My own feeling about this is that it's also because you're sort of being charged from the get-go anyway I've always thought of checking out as mainly involving returning the key. In "express checkout" procedures you typically leave the key in your room, and the hotel (which probably slipped an invoice under your door) just charges your credit card and everyone lives happily ever after.)
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BrE check out = AmE check out, but the British ... as far as getting into their car and driving away.

That seems dead wrong to me. "Check out" in a hotel-travel sort of context refers precisely to the things you ... "checking out" refers specifically to the formal act of checking out of a hotel. Coop, I'm right, am I not?

As far as I'm personally concerned, "checking out" is exactly what Chambers says is the British concept. I have no idea what he's talking about as far as "everything to do with departure". Checking out begins and ends at the hotel desk.
The getting

That seems dead wrong to me. "Check out" in a ... to the formal act of checking out of a hotel.

What I am trying to say, rightly or wrongly, is that the American mind seems to focus on the check ... the check out, while the Brits have generalised the act of driving off, in order to describe the full procedure.

Obviously, you have picked this up from some American(s) you have met. It's a strange concept to me, though, and I've stayed in a lot of hotels.
I might tell my wife "Let's get ready to check-out" as a way of saying pack the bags, but the check-out is done at the desk. I know I wouldn't tell her "Let's get ready for departure".
What about these idioms? Are them in fashion or out of fashion?

17. Mind the step. 18. I'll get it straight away. 19. Mind your head.

These three are strictly Hiberno-British. You might catch a Hiberno-Britophile like Tony Cooper using them, but otherwise they aren't used by Americans (this statement is subject to the Truly Donovan Proviso).

Nah. Us real Hibernowhatevers say:
17. Mind the step, ***, or ye'll be *** over teakettle.
18. Me get it straight away? It's your feckin' call, isn't it now.
19. Mind that great, thick head of yours, ye eejit.

We talk that way around our house all the time.
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An alternative possible explanation for why Americans use the term ... we say "check out" less frequently than the Americans do?

You don't "check out" the babes?
>
Yes. "Pay the bill" is quite familiar too, but factor in the fact that we often pay the bill while checking in. Thus checking out can become a quick matter of tossing the key on the counter and leaving. If the actual stay does not match the expected number of days, or if phone charges or other charges were incurred, then there are adjustments done while checking out.

Richard Maurer To reply, remove half
Sunnyvale, California of a homonym of a synonym for also.
}
}> What about these idioms? Are them in fashion or out of fashion? }
}
}> 17. Mind the step.
}>
}> 18. I'll get it straight away.
}>
}> 19. Mind your head.
}
} These three are strictly Hiberno-British. You might catch a } Hiberno-Britophile like Tony Cooper using them, but otherwise they aren't } used by Americans (this statement is subject to the Truly Donovan } Proviso).
"Mind the door" has been attested on alt.usage.english a few times by an American. Doubters can google it.

R. J. Valentine
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}
}>

}>
}>> What about these idioms? Are them in fashion or out of fashion? }>
}>
}>> 17. Mind the step.
}>>
}>> 18. I'll get it straight away.
}>>
}>> 19. Mind your head.
}>
}>These three are strictly Hiberno-British. You might catch a }>Hiberno-Britophile like Tony Cooper using them, but otherwise they aren't }>used by Americans (this statement is subject to the Truly Donovan }>Proviso).
}
} Nah. Us real Hibernowhatevers say:
}
} 17. Mind the step, ***, or ye'll be *** over teakettle. }
} 18. Me get it straight away? It's your feckin' call, isn't it now. }
} 19. Mind that great, thick head of yours, ye eejit. }
} We talk that way around our house all the time.
How about "Mind the gap"? Do you say "Mind the gap"?

R. J. Valentine
Genealogical discourse incorporated by reference.
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