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}> }>> What about these idioms? Are them in fashion or out of fashion? }> }> }>> 17. Mind the ... talk that way around our house all the time. How about "Mind the gap"? Do you say "Mind the gap"?

My wife would when advising my daughter to check the sale ads in the newspaper. Herself (distinctly Hibernowhatever) is a bit mature for the styles offered by Gap.
Jerry Friedman ha scritto nel messaggio
1. Keep it under your hat.

"Keep it secret." This sounds obsolete to me, an American.

What's another way of saying that in American English?
2. We've got to get to the bottom of this.

"We've got to understand why this strange thing is happening." This sounds old-fashioned to me--I'd expect to hear it in a parody of a detective story.

What's another way of saying that? I mean an in fashion way:)

Bye Jerry Franco
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Jerry Friedman ha scritto nel messaggio

"Keep it secret." This sounds obsolete to me, an American.

What's another way of saying that in American English?

"Tell anyone and die".

Ross Howard
In article (Email Removed), Jerry Friedman (Email Removed) writes:
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Einde O'Callaghan ha scritto nel messaggio ... CUT Thank you. And what about these? 1. Keep it under your hat.

"Keep it secret." This sounds obsolete to me, an American.

In the UK, it might be obsolescent, but it's certainly not yet obsolete.
2. We've got to get to the bottom of this.

"We've got to understand why this strange thing is happening." This sounds old-fashioned to me--I'd expect to hear it in a parody of a detective story.

The expression is still commonly used in the UK.

I suppose these two examples indicate that idioms in American English and in British English often differ.

-- John Hall "If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; but if he will be content to begin with doubts, he shall end in certainties." Francis Bacon (1561-1626)
John Hall ha scritto nel messaggio ...
"Keep it secret." This sounds obsolete to me, an American.

In the UK, it might be obsolescent, but it's certainly not yet obsolete.

What do you mean exactly?

Do you still use it?

Let me know

bye John Franco
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[nq:1]John Hall ha scritto nel messaggio ...
In the UK, it might be obsolescent, but it's certainly not yet obsolete.

What do you mean exactly? Do you still use it? Let me know

It would be "What do you mean, exactly?" It's a request for additional information or clarification about the meaning of what has been said or written.

Yes, we still use it. Commonly, by some.
In article , Dio (Email Removed) writes:
John Hall ha scritto nel messaggio ...

In the UK, it might be obsolescent, but it's certainly not yet obsolete.

What do you mean exactly?

"Obsolete" means no longer used, whereas "obsolescent" means becoming less used as time goes by but not yet obsolete, though expected to become obsolete eventually.
Do you still use it?

Yes. -- John Hall "Think wrongly if you please, but in all cases think for yourself." Doris Lessing
What about these idioms? Are them in fashion or out of fashion?

Aside idioms, do you like Ronnie James DIO?
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} My wife would when advising my daughter to check the sale ads in the } newspaper. Herself (distinctly Hibernowhatever) is a bit mature for } the styles offered by Gap.
ObLawler: They must have some sedate grey three skirts.

R. J. Valentine
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