1 3 4 5 6 7  9 10
[nq:1]In fact, come to think of it, "Good afternoon" is pretty rare in most languages (that I know) and is becoming fairly old-fashioned in English.
"Good afternoon" wouldn't be considered old-fashioned in NZ. It is used frequently (along with "good morning") in business telephoning, as well as in general conversation. -- Peg
Unlike in French or German, "Good day" *is* old-fashioned, and in fact I have heard it used more often as an archaic way of saying goodbye than hello. Sometimes to cut short an undesired conversation.

The character Fez on That '70s Show is famous for saying "Good day" to end a conversation. His interlocutor will invariably try to continue speaking and Fez will snap, "I said, 'Good day'!"
Fez is of unknown nationality. (Even the name "Fez" is simply a pronunciation of the intialism from "Foreign Exchange Student". He mentioned his real name once, but unfortunately a school bell rang at exactly the wrong moment.) He sounds of Central or South American extraction, though something middle eastern or Indian subcontinent-y isn't out of the question. It's understood that his use of the phrase "Good day" is part of his foreign peculiarity.

Opus the Penguin (that's my real email addy)
You snipped my sig!
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
[nq:1]In article , Robert Bannister (Email Removed) writes
I have a Macedonian friend who often says "Dobro popladne" ... (that I know) and is becoming fairly old-fashioned in English.

Not in UK English. Saying "Good morning" after 12 noon is a nice trigger for a friendly smile over here. ... I know "Good day" is rarely used in Britain, but I can't imagine an East Ender saying "Good afternoon" either.

Talking about East Enders: on another thread, there was mention of the Queen's "orf" pronunciation of "off". It seems to me, that although the vowels are not identical, "orf" is alive and well in the East End of London, as is "yer" for "year" (another Queenism).

-- Rob Bannister
I have a Macedonian friend who often says "Dobro popladne" ... of it, "Good afternoon" is pretty rare in most languages

Absolutely standard in Dutch. I run most of my errands in the afternoon, and "Goede middag"

Strange: that looks as though it ought to mean "Good noon". I don't think I've ever heard "Guten Nachmittag" in German; the standard seems to be that the second time you meet people in the morning or if you meet later in the day, you say "Guten Tag". Now I'm wondering whether I ever heard "Guten Vormittag".

Rob Bannister
Absolutely standard in Dutch. I run most of my errands in the afternoon, and "Goede middag"

Strange: that looks as though it ought to mean "Good noon". I don't think I've ever heard "Guten Nachmittag" in ... if you meet later in the day, you say "Guten Tag". Now I'm wondering whether I ever heard "Guten Vormittag".

I wouldn't think so. "Guten Abend" is used for the evening, though, and "Guten Morgen" for the morning.
Latvian follows the same convention.
In English I use "Good morning", "Good afternoon", and "Good evening", but never "Good day" or any abbreviated form of that.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I have a Macedonian friend who often says "Dobro popladne" ... (that I know) and is becoming fairly old-fashioned in English.

Not in UK English. Saying "Good morning" after 12 noon is a nice trigger for a friendly smile over here.

I don't know if "Good afternoon" is old-fashioned or if it simply never was in fashion in much of the English-speaking world. We rarely hear it in Ireland; it is rare in the parts of America I've lived in. There are many ways of greeting a person, so there are alternatives to a friendly "Good morning" in the early afternoon hours, but it remains a possibility in Ireland and elsewhere: in Maine, where I last lived in the US, for example. If I hadn't read Alec's post, I'd have said that only stuffy people say "Good afternoon".

Charles Riggs
Email address: chriggs¦at¦eircom¦dot¦net
In article , Robert Bannister (Email Removed) writes
In article , Robert Bannister (Email Removed) writes Not ... is a nice trigger for a friendly smile over here.

Yeah, you get overprecise people doing that over here too, but few of us say "Good afternoon" anymore: it's "G'day". ... imagine an East Ender saying "Good afternoon" either. No, they would simply say 'ar'ernoon with glottal stops on the '

-- Dave OSOS#24 (Email Removed) Remove my gerbil for email replies

Yamaha XJ900S & Wessex sidecar, the sexy one Yamaha XJ900F & Watsonian Monaco, the comfortable one

http://dswindell.members.beeb.net
[nq:1]Talking about East Enders: on another thread, there was mention of the Queen's "orf" pronunciation of "off". It seems to ... not identical, "orf" is alive and well in the East End of London, as is "yer" for "year" (another Queenism).
Only amongst people of a certain age. I couldn't imagine a young East Ender saing "orf".

Matthew Huntbach
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Robert Bannister (Email Removed) writes:
"Good afternoon" is simply not said in the language. In fact, come to think of it, "Good afternoon" is pretty rare in most languages (that I know)

When I studied Spanish twenty-odd years ago, "Buenas tardes" was common. I don't know if it still is, but with 48,000 Spanish Google hits, it can't be all that uncommon.
and is becoming fairly old-fashioned in English.

It seems pretty standard here in California. In fact, if someone says "Good morning", and realizes that it is, in fact, just after noon, they will often correct themselves to "Good afternoon".

-- Evan Kirshenbaum +-- HP Laboratories |Of course, over the first 10^-10 1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 |seconds and 10^-30 cubic Palo Alto, CA 94304 |centimeters it averages out to |zero, but when you look in (Email Removed) |detail.. (650)857-7572 | Philip Morrison

http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
Show more