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hello,

i have a problem with idioms, could you tell me if I used them correctly, please?

1.She's written TV scripts before, so her experience naturally gives her the edge over newcomers to television writers.

2. I've often had difficult pupils to deal with , but for laziness young Smith really takes the buiscuit.

3. That's slander! Dodson can't expect me to take it lying down. I shall see my lawyer immediately.

There are more idioms than sentences, the idiom I haven't used is 'take sb under one's wing', so maybe this is the idiom that fits in the sentences above if they are wrong.

thank you for help
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Yogi2005hello,

i have a problem with idioms, could you tell me if I used them correctly, please?

1.She's written TV scripts before, so her experience naturally gives her the edge over newcomers to television writers.
Correct. It means to give her the advantage.

2. I've often had difficult pupils to deal with , but for laziness young Smith really takes the buiscuit.
Correct. It means to take the top prize (in an easy contest).

3. That's slander! Dodson can't expect me to take it lying down. I shall see my lawyer immediately.
Correct. It means to accept something (something that's not pleasant) without much resistance.

There are more idioms than sentences, the idiom I haven't used is 'take sb under one's wing', so maybe this is the idiom that fits in the sentences above if they are wrong.

From Cambridge dictionary:
take sb under your wing
If you take someone under your wing, you start to protect and take care of them:
I was a bit lonely and fed up at the time and she took me under her wing.

thank you for help

Hope these help.

Comments  
hi yogi,

that's perfect, well done. To 'take sb under one's wing' means to look after somebody in a situation where you know more or have been there longer (for example in the workplace, an employee who has been there for years may take a new employee under his/her wing)

have fun
 Danyoo's reply was promoted to an answer.