The bar chart compares the percentage of people using different types of transport to commute in a European city in 1960, 1980, and 2000. The four types of transport are bus, car, bike, and foot.

Overall, while the percentage of people traveling on foot was the highest in 1960, traveling by bus became the most popular way of commuting in 1980. Additionally, cars were the most preferred mode of transport in 2000.

The percentage of people traveling on foot decreased from about 36% in 1960 to around 9% in 2000. Likewise, traveling by bike decreased in popularity, from 26% of commuters to only 6% between 1960 and 2000. On the contrary, cars became more and more popular as a means of transport, rising from 6% of people traveling by car to almost 40% in the span of 4 decades. In 1960, approximately 17% of people commuted to work by bus. This percentage then increased to more than 25% in 1980 before decreasing to around 18% in 2000.

The bar chart compares the percentage of people using different types of transport to commute in a European city in 1960, 1980, and 2000. The four types of transport are bus, car, bike, and walking. There is also an unnamed category, not shown, that is needed to make the totals add up to 100%. foot. (I suspect that the person who created this task is mathematically inept. Usually, there are no hidden "gotchas" - tricks and traps - in real exams. The values for this "other" category are 18%, 13% and 33%. Maybe they flew to work in a spaceship or helicopter. See the pie chart for 2000 below. I strongly advise that you watch out for these defective practice tests and do not use them..)

Overall, while the percentage of people who walked to work traveling on foot was the highest in 1960, traveling by bus became the most popular way of commuting in 1980. Additionally, Cars were the most preferred mode of transport in 2000.

The percentage of people walking traveling on foot decreased from about 36% in 1960 to around 9% in 2000. Likewise, traveling by bike decreased in popularity, from 26% of commuters to only 6% between 1960 and 2000. On the contrary, cars became more and more popular as a means of transport, rising from 6% of people traveling by car (redundant, repetitive) to almost 40% in the span of 4 decades. In 1960, approximately 17% of people commuted to work by bus. This percentage then increased to more than 25% in 1980 before decreasing to around 18% in 2000.


You can usefully combine the named categories into "motor vehicle" and "human powered". Those are reasonable higher-level categories.

Nearly six out of ten commuters used human-powered modes in 1960, as compared to one in four who rode in a motor vehicle. By 2000, that had changed markedly. Half of the commuters went by car or bus and only 15% biked or walked.