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No one can predict how he will react if his request gets refused.

If I change the verb 'react' into the noun 'reaction' as:

No one can predict his reaction...

does this sentence below still make the same sense?

No one can predict his reaction if his request gets refused.

(I'm wondering if it's possible for 'if' to refer to a noun in front).
Comments  
TakaNo one can predict how he will react if his request gets refused.

If I change the verb 'react' into the noun 'reaction' as:

No one can predict his reaction...

does this sentence below still make the same sense?

No one can predict his reaction if his request gets refused.

(I'm wondering if it's possible for 'if' to refer to a noun in front).
Yes.
Yoong LiatYes.
Are you sure?

Could you help me find a couple more examples of the same kind of 'if'-one that refers to a noun in front-from reliable sites or something?
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They are both badly written sentences at the outset and should be conditionals:

No one could predict how he would react if his request were refused.
or
No one could predict how he would react were his request refused.

and

No one could predict what his reaction would be if his request were refused.
AnonymousThey are both badly written sentences at the outset and should be conditionals:

No one could predict how he would react if his request were refused.
or
No one could predict how he would react were his request refused.

and

No one could predict what his reaction would be if his request were refused.
I don't think so.

"no one can predict * will"

is well represented at the BBC sites:

BBC SPORT | Rugby Union | Internationals | Ireland v England ...

BBC SPORT VERDICT: England pip Ireland 9-6, but in front of a packed and partisan Lansdowne Road crowd, no-one can predict with any certainty who will be ...


BBC News | MEDIA REPORTS | North Korea slams war games

Warnings. No one can predict how adversely these war manoeuvres will affect the inter-Korean relations. South Korea's president. President Kim Dae-jung ...

For more examples:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=site%3Abbc.co.uk+%22no+one+can+predict+*+will%22+&bt...

Also, a sentence with "if," to be closer to the example:

BBC NEWS | World | Middle East | In quotes: Global reaction to ...

"No-one can predict what will happen if things get out of control. "The Arabs have declared peace as a strategic choice... and put forward a clear and fair ...
I'm quite puzzled by this sentence.

I'm wondering if it's possible for 'if' to refer to a noun in front
if is not a word that refers to anything. It has only grammatical function.
Neither is the word if pronomial in nature, so it cannot "refer back" to some previous referring expression, i.e., it cannot have an antecedent.
_________

Whatever the solution to the terminological puzzle above, you might consider the following parsing:

If his request gets refused, no one can predict [how he will react / his reaction].

This may be thought of as
(Prediction of reaction) (under condition of refusal) .

rather than

His reaction [if / in the case where] his request gets refused cannot be predicted.


This may be thought of as
Prediction of (reaction under condition of refusal).
_______

Setting aside the possible correctness of either parsing, I believe it is examples of the second structure that you are asking for, if I correctly understand the discussion so far. I'm sure such sentences can be found -- or even invented if necessary. The noun would almost certainly have to be a deverbal noun. An example follows.

Confronted with the pleas of his children, the father's response if (he was) pressed was always, "Go ask your mother".

CJ
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CalifJimI'm quite puzzled by this sentence.

I'm wondering if it's possible for 'if' to refer to a noun in front
if is not a word that refers to anything. It has only grammatical function.
Neither is the word if pronomial in nature, so it cannot "refer back" to some previous referring expression, i.e., it cannot have an antecedent.
Sorry about the confusion, Jim. I was just wondering whether 'if' could be used as a condition not only for a sentence but for a noun in front.
CalifJim
Setting aside the possible correctness of either parsing, I believe it is examples of the second structure that you are asking for, if I correctly understand the discussion so far. I'm sure such sentences can be found -- or even invented if necessary. The noun would almost certainly have to be a deverbal noun. An example follows.

Confronted with the pleas of his children, the father's response if (he was) pressed was always, "Go ask your mother".

Good.

Now I'm thinking about this sentence:

Some may be concerned about the reaction of the one making the request if they refuse---will they have to cope with an angy response?

My book says it's:

(Concern about reaction)(under condition of refusal)

but I thought it might be:

Concern about (reaction under condition of refusal).

Which interpretation do you think is correct, Jim? Or do you think both interpretation are grammatically and semantically possible?
I'm inclined to think the interpretation in your book is the correct one. Nevertheless, I have only my own reaction as a guide. That is, the interpretation in your book is also the one that comes to my mind first.

On the other hand, I think both interpretations are grammatically and semantically possible.

CJ
My initial reaction was the same as the book. But after reading it carefully, I was a bit confused because of its context. The original text is:

Some people fear that if they refuse to do what is asked of them the peson doing the asking will no longer like them-yet, if the only reason they like you is that you are a willing slave, do you really want their admiration? Others may be concerned about the reaction of the one making the request if they refuse-will they have to cope with an angy response?

To me it seemed that there was correspondence between:

Some people=fear of (being hated under condition of refusal)

and

Other people=concern about (reaction under conditon of refusal)
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