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Hello,

An EFL test question goes:
If you ____ in America, you must have found that Americans are almost all colors and races.

An option is "had been;" the other option is "were."

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1.

In my humble opinion,

"Americans are almost of all colors and races"

would read more idiomatic.

Or, in this case, the that-clause without "of" doesn't bother native English speakers, does it?

2.

I guess "had been" would agree with the grammar.
- If you had been in America, you must have found that ....

How about "were"?
- If you were in America, you must have found that ....

I think "were" would do in this case.

What is/are your verdict(s)?

Sincerely,
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exodejavuAn EFL test question goes:
If you __ in America, you must have found that Americans are almost all colors and races.

An option is "had been;" the other option is "were."
I find this a strange question! It doesn't sound completely idiomatic to my ear with either had been or were. I would probably choose were.
exodejavu in this case, the that-clause without "of" doesn't bother native English speakers, does it?
That's true, but as I said, the whole sentence seems awkward.

CJ
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Dear CJ,

Thanks for your swift reply, but can you talk more about the strangeness of the test question? Emotion: smile
What is strange is that, to my ear, at least, there is no "right answer". I can't figure out what knowledge the question is attempting to test. It may be some arcane or imagined rule about the use of "must have", but I'm just speculating. I really have no idea what the point of the question is.

CJ