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I'm curious to know whether or not there is enough information to assert whether "is" or "are" is appropriate in the above sentence fragment.
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I would say that is is in a higher register, but that both are possible. Just guessing, I believe more than 95% of people would use are in ordinary conversation.

CJ
Is there any particular rule stating as much?
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AnonymousIs there any particular rule stating as much?

Only a rule of thumb. If you expect several to be offended, use the plural. If you expect that only one, or none, will be offended, use the singular.
So, if in a contextual vacuum, either is correct?
Even though a singular noun after any is common, I would only use a plural verb in your fragment: If any of you are offended...

For a singular verb, I would say: If any one of you is offended...

CB
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But doesn't "If any of you is/are offended . . ." mean the same thing as "If any (one) of you is offended . . . ?"
AnonymousIs there any particular rule stating as much?
http://www.bartleby.com/61/55/A0355500.html
"When used as a pronoun, any can take either a singular or plural verb, depending on how it is construed: Any of these books is suitable (that is, any one). But are any (that is, some) of them available?"

CJ
AnonymousBut doesn't "If any of you is/are offended . . ." mean the same thing as "If any (one) of you is offended . . . ?"
No, not necessarily. I would interpret "is" and "are" in that fragment as follows:

- If any of you is offended = If one person is offended
- If any of you are offended = If any people are offended

When you use "any are" the reference is to a number that is at least one, and it possibly could be more than one (i.e. "some").
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