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1) If you’re not careful, you can get into even worse trouble.

2) If you’re not careful, you could get into even worse trouble.

What's the difference between 1) and 3), 2) and 4)?

3) You can get into even worse trouble when you're not careful.

4) You could get into even worse trouble when you're not careful.

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Comments  (Page 3) 
CalifJim
Rizan Malik13) You would get into even worse trouble when you were not careful.

The pattern in 13) makes more sense. It features the use of "would" as a signal of past time. Here "would" is equivalent to "used to".

13a) You used to get into even worse trouble when you were not careful.

CJ

Can we also not treat sentence 13) above as the result clause of an implicit second conditional?

[If + something], you would get into even worse trouble when you were not careful.

Rizan Malik

Can we also not treat sentence 13) above as the result clause of an implicit second conditional?

[If + something], you would get into even worse trouble when you were not careful.

No, not as an isolated sentence. You would need to set that up with an explicit if-clause or with a preceding context that led the reader down that path. Standing alone, without any if-clause or other context, it strikes me as only a sentence about a past habitual situation.

CJ

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