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He could've written a much better book if he was working with me on it.

He could've written a much better book if he were working with me on it.

He could've written a much better book if he had been working with me on it.

I've learned all above sentences carry the same meaning. Am I right?

Thanks
LiJ
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Comments  
I think only this is correct:

He could've written a much better book if he had worked was working with me on it.

All the 3 given by you are wrong.
SarangadharI think only this is correct:

He could've written a much better book if he had worked was working with me on it.

All the 3 given by you are wrong.

Thanks.

How about: if he worked with me on it.
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Sarangadhar
I think only this is correct:

He could've written a much better book if he had worked was working with me on it.

All the 3 given by you are wrong.

Thanks.

How about: if he worked with me on it.

You can write like this:

He would/could write a much better book if he worked with me.

he will write a much better book if he works with me.

but not "he could/would have written a much better book if he worked with me"
I know these rules, Sarangadhar. Thanks for your reply. Emotion: smile

Some native speakers of English told me:

You can use past simple if it is obvious that you're mentioning the past. In conversations, the past simple is commonly used, in my opinion.

LiJ
I've learned all above sentences carry the same meaning. Am I right?
Yes. They are all understandable as having the same meaning. However, only the last one is technically correct.

CJ
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CalifJim only the last one is technically correct.

CJ

CJ

I think last one is also wrong.
Thanks, CJ and Sarangadhar. Emotion: smile

LiJ

I think last one is also wrong.
Yes, I know. You said that earlier in this thread.

Emotion: smile
CJ
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