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Hi

In my language, there is a famous saying whose literal meaning in English would be:

If you dig a hole for others, you're sure to fall in it yourself.

I'd like to know if there is any English equivalent.

Thanks,

Tom

PS: What's more natural - there is or there's?
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"Don't dig yourself into a hole" when somebody says something they shouldn't have, is the closest I can think of.

Or "When you are in a hole, stop digging" If somebody is trying to rectify a slip of the tongue and then by explaining it, makes it worse

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Mr. TomIf you dig a hole for others, you're sure to fall in it yourself.
Actually, your literal translation works quite well in English. I think you may have just invented a new saying, if it doesn't already exist!
Mr. Tom
PS: What's more natural - there is or there's?

In this context both are fine. In formal writing, use "there is". In conversation you would normally use "there's" (unless you are emphasising the word "is").
I do not remember the exact words but it is something like:

If you dig a grave for someone else, remember to dig one for yourself.

"There's" is more "natural" -- especially in conversation.
Hi,

You might like to look at this phrase that is fairly common with educated people.

A petard was commonly placed underground, inside a tunnel.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petard

http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/hoist%20by%20your%20own%20petard.html

'hoist with one's own petard'

Clive
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