When car race starts, not all cars are arranged in a line. Some are at the front line and some are far behind. Why do they arrange cars this way and what rule they follow to select cars for the front line? Suppose, if Michael Schumacher is in the red-marked car shown in the below link, then obviously he has an edge over his competitors, specially over the one in pink-marked car, before the race begins.

Link:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/pictures4everybody/1470349538 /
There isn't space for all the racers to be in a single line.

The fastest racers are put at the front - partly because they deserve to be there and also for safety reasons. Imagine what might happen if there is a slow car in front of very fast cars and blocking their way through...an accident waiting to happen!
In Formula 1 there is a qualification before a race where the starting position is determined according to the lap time of a driver.
The fastest in the qualification will start from up-front, the slowest from the last position.

To Nona:
Nice theory. I've never thought about it that way...seems so logic. Emotion: smile
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It's the same idea with most large races. Look at the line-up for the London marathon, for example. You couldn't just mix up over 35,000 people at random. The best runners are at the front, the average runners in the middle, and the 'fun-runners' at the back. That's why the wheelchair marathon runners go first - they are fastest of all!
Nona The BritThat's why the wheelchair marathon runners go first - they are fastest of all!
Of course, those runners on wheelchairs will have some kind of disability. Do they have some kind of special marathon in which only disabled persons can participate or they just participate in marathon of persons without any disability?
In the London marathon they have their own race.
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BluepalmsThe fastest in the qualification will start from up-front, the slowest from the last position.

Huh? I thought it's vice-versa. It's the opposite in PS games... for balancing reasons.