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To me it sounds a bit out of the ordinary bt have learnt it is the correct usage...
My Query??
A) Looking forward to learn wat effect does this "IF ONLY Because" phrase renders...
B) Under what circumstances do we use it.
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Comments  
Not sure what your questions are ...[:^)]
We should all come home for Christmas, if only because it will make our mother happy.

It's not the most standard usage - and it's a rather awkward, I think, but you can think of it as "we should do it for this reason, even if you don't otherwise have a good reason to."
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X if only because Y
X even if/though the only reason for X is/was that Y

Jack ate the last cookie if only because he wanted to wash the plate.

He ate the last cookie even though the only reason for doing so was that he wanted to wash the plate. He didn't eat it because he was hungry, or for any other reasons. He just wanted to get rid of it so he could wash the plate.

CJ
Then, what would be the difference between:

Jack ate the last cookie if only because he wanted to wash the plate.
Jack ate the last cookie because he wanted to wash the plate.
LatinThen, what would be the difference between:

Jack ate the last cookie if only because he wanted to wash the plate.
Jack ate the last cookie because he wanted to wash the plate.
See:
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if only

used when you want to say how doing something simple would make it possible to avoid something unpleasant:

If only she'd listen to what he's saying, I'm sure they could work it out.

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=55497&dict=CALD
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thus you should change your example to fit.

The way it is, I am reading the 1st:
Jack ate the last cookie even though it was just because he wanted to wash the plate.
which might not be that bad in the end.
(the only reason for eating the cookie was because the wanted to have the plate ready for washing, not because he liked it)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Jack ate the last cookie if only because he wanted to wash the plate.
Jack ate the last cookie because he wanted to wash the plate.

The difference is that the second sentence leaves out the idea that the only reason for eating the cookie was to wash the plate. It also leaves out that certain stylistic 'something' that the first has. The reason in the first sentence has a certain subtractive value, whereas the reason in the second has additive value. In the first sentence, but only because might replace if only because. In the second sentence, one can easily imagine extending the thought with further reasons: because ... and because ... and because ...

CJ
I would like to know the exact meaning and usage of this phrase "if only because"
Did you read the posts in this thread? Can you explain why you are still confused?
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