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Hi,
I have a question to that sentence :

"I'll see you baby, when the ice has broken"

Is it a type of conditional or what?
How to translate it? What does it mean?

Thanks in advance.

Best Regards, Peter
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Can we have more context?

Usually "to break the ice" means to get to know someone, but that doesn't seem to make sense here.

I suppose the person could be living in a remote northern (or extreme southern) climate that gets ice bound in the winter, and after the thaw, when the ice breaks, people can travel to and from there again.

There should be a comma on either side of baby - I'll see you when the ice has broken, baby.
Is it a type of conditional or what?
Yes, it seems it is.
Grammar GeekCan we have more context?
Usually "to break the ice" means to get to know someone, but that doesn't seem to make sense here.
Why not. The phrase "to break the ice" means to meet someone for the first time and, I think, it does make sense here. Maybe he didn't meet her in real life but have talked to her before in the Internet.
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Sorry guys - i made my question a little confusing. The point of my question is that i would like to know what form/tense/principle was used to make that sentence. Im trying to understand this in that way - I + will + Present Perfect - is that possible? The fragment "when the ice has broken" means something in the past, and before it we have "I will see You baby" - it means that we're talking about a future - so how can we say that smth will happen only AFTER the thing that actually happend?
This sentence is a fragment of Robert Plant's lyric - song "Like I've Never Been Gone".
I know that is not a "conditional" - we have four types of them and none have a part that uses Present Perfect. So is it a kind of tense or what?
Thank You in advance one more time.
Best Regards, Peter.
I still think that it's a conditional sentence. But I am not sure. I think that present perfect emphasizes the sequence of actions. First, the ice had broken, then he saw his baby. Correct me If I am wrong :-)
Future.

I will see you at 2 p.m. I will see you in May. I will see you in 2008.

I will see you [after some event has happened]. I will see you after you return from lunch. I will see you after you've returned from your trip to Italy. I will see you after you've completed your world tour.
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That's what i was looking for. Thank You for Your help Emotion: smile
Im trying to understand this in that way - I + will + Present Perfect - is that possible? The fragment "when the ice has broken" means something in the past, and before it we have "I will see You baby"
Yes.

... will ... when [PRES PERF / PRESENT] are not only possible, but typical.

No. when the ice has broken does not mean something in the past. It means when the ice will have been broken (in the future), but we don't use will after when in this kind of adverbial of time.

We will be happy when classes have ended. = *We will be happy when classes will have ended.

Mrs. Jones will take care of the matter [when / once / after / as soon as] Mrs. Smith has left. = *Mrs. Jones will take care of the matter [when / once / after / as soon as] Mrs. Smith will have left.


CJ
That's curious for me (Pole). From my point of view a possibility of use Present Perfect to indicate a point in the future is a totally new thing (doesn't matter in what types of construction). Thank You for Your help one more time.
By the way - great forum - maybe it's high time to register?
Best Regards, Peter
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