+0
Hi,
I have some doubts about this:

I'll check out that website, and then I'll let you know what I will have found. I know you don't usually repeat the "will", so it becomes the following:

I'll check out that website, and then I'll let you know what I've found. This should be ok, but now I was wondering if I can use a simple past tense there, without changing the meaning. Is the following still the same and is it used? This:

I'll check out that website, and then I'll let you know what I found.

Thanks Emotion: smile

Comments  
I'll check out that website, and then I'll let you know what I found.

You have a future and past disagreement in this sentence.

consider: I will check out that website and let you know what I find.

One "will" is sufficient in the sentence becasue the "letting you know" and "finding" is in the future.
Yup, "what I find" is the most natural sounding to these American ears.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
This is funny (or confusing?) Emotion: stick out tongue
You were answering and at the same time someone (American, native speaker) just told me that "I'll check out that website and then I'll let you know what I found" is ok and is the preferred way of saying it (instead of "what I've found").
So, maybe I don't quite understand, but the way I see it:

I'll check out that website and let you know what I find --> it's ok, of course, but checking out the site, letting you know, and finding stuff all happen more or less at the same time in the future.

I'll check out that website (in a little while) and then (maybe this evening) I'll let you know what I've found ---> Here first you check out the site, and then (not at the same time) you tell the other person. That's why I need a second "will". But what about the other verb, "have found"? Someone just told me I can further simplify it to "found". Maybe that's done only in informal English... any comments?

Thank you in advance Emotion: smile
Yup again. I was going to say "And tomorrow when I see you again, I'll let you know what I found."

Either find or found work just fine. (Wasn't that lovely alliteration?)
Cool,
Either found or find are fine in that sentence of mine, then If you say they are ok that way... (do you mean something like that by "alliteration"? Emotion: stick out tongue)

Thanks [y]
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
As I already explained, "found" and "have found" have tense agreement problem. "will" dictates that the "letting you know" and "finding" have not yet materialized yet. So to use present perfect tense "have found" is somewhat illogical. Of course the meaning still came across. On a side note, not every native speaks proper English. No offense! But use whatever tickles your fancy.
But the "finding out" takes place before the "letting you know."

I don't see a conflict.

If you are thinking from the present moment when both the checking and finding are still in the future, then use find. If you are thinking abou the moment of telling, when the finding is complete, then you can use "found."
>>>If you are thinking from the present moment when both the checking and finding are still in the future, then use find>> Exactly!

The context has been established such that "I will check the website and then let him know what I find. Based on this sequence, "have found" or "found" simply doesn't sound right when you look at it carefully.

That's all...
Try out our live chat room.