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Hi,

"Like a bridge over troubled water
I will lay me down"

Is any difference in meaning between "I will lay me down" and "I will lie down"?

Thanks
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meantolearnHi,

"Like a bridge over troubled water
I will lie lay [myself] down"

Is any difference in meaning between "I will lay me down" and "I will lie down"?

Thanks

Hi, Meantolearn.This way is really no difference. Did I misunderstand you? Emotion: smile
Hi, Fandorin.

Are you a native English speaker?

I don't think you mislead me.

Thanks

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No, I am not. But the phrasal verb "lay down" is transitive which means it should connect direct object, and that phrasal verb doesn't fit the bill in your case.
You're welcome. Emotion: smile
"I will lay me down" is a more poetic way to say it -- it sounds vaguely like a prayer. There is a common childhood bedtime prayer that begins, "Now I lay me down to sleep..."
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meantolearnIs any difference in meaning between "I will lay me down" and "I will lie down"?
No difference except style. "lay me down" is in Biblical style, i.e., old-fashioned. (It's in one of the psalms, for example.) This particular way of expressing the thought works well in the song, but it's not the way that anybody talks or writes anymore in "normal" circumstances.

CJ
CalifJim
meantolearnIs any difference in meaning between "I will lay me down" and "I will lie down"?
No difference except style. "lay me down" is in Biblical style, i.e., old-fashioned. (It's in one of the psalms, for example.)

This particular way of expressing the thought works well in the song,
CJ

Right! It works well for two reasons. The first is the obvious meter of the poetry. The second is a very visual image of putting one's self over a spot of precariousness...like the chivalrous knight (or swaggering cowboy) offering to lay his cape (or jacket) over the mud for the fair maiden's safe passage, keeping her feet and shoes clean.
Heya,

This thread seems old so I don't know if anyone will ever find this, but...

The phrase "I will lay me down" is grammatically incorrect, but was written this way because it builds off of a metaphor.

In English, we would say "I will lay a bridge down over troubled waters," so in this song, "a bridge" is replaced with the word "me" to show that the speaker is willing to make himself a bridge for others.

Long story short, using "I will lay me down" has a connotation of selflessness such as in the phrase "to lay down one's life;" "I will lie down," on the other hand, is taken for its literal meaning.

Hope this helps!,
-Maythe.
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