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Hi.

Sometimes I feel a little out of it saying "I'll take you up on that." Does the phrase below sound okay in this context?

Katie: I hope there is anyone who could volunteer his time for helping this gentleman in a wheelchair to get to the station. I wish I could, but I have my hands full for another commitment.

Scott: I could drive him there. What time should I be ready?

Katie: Thanks a lot, Scott. I'll take you up on that. Does three-ish sound okay to you?

Hiro
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It's all right. I'll take you up on that expresses the acceptance of an offer, and that's what you have here.

I've also heard it in a very slightly different context, which may or may not be more typical. (We'll wait and see what others have to say about it.) Specifically, I've heard it in the case where the offer is made and I'll take you up on that is said, with no intention of accepting immediately, but with the intention of following through later.

-- You have to come visit us when you're in California. (on the phone with someone in Illinois).
-- I'll take you up on that.
(with the intention of visiting California sometime within the next three years)

CJ
Does the expression show any thankfulness?

Hiro
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I think one has to be sure that when you are using the phrase "I will take you up on that," it is being used in a response to an OFFER. How do you know if it is an offer of that nature? I think the language in the sentence has to be very clear so that it leaves almost no doubt in one's mind as to the certainty of that.
Hi guys,

I've also heard this phrase used to indicate that you want to dispute a point that someone has made. eg

A: George Bush was wrong to invade Iraq.

B: Wait a minute, I'd like to take you up on that. I think he had no choice. etc.

Best wishes, Clive
Clive - you are right. Depending on the content and context of the converstaion. "to take someone up on something" could change greatly.

If I said to you "I have a few friends coming over this weekend for a BBQ gathering, drop by if you have time".

You said "I having nothing planned. I guess I will take you up on it" (you just accepted the invitation)

On another scenario like the one Clive showed: "I'd like to take you up on that" means "I'd to challenge or debate with you on that".


A: George Bush was wrong to invade Iraq.

B: Wait a minute, I'd like to take you up on that. I think he had no choice. etc.
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Re: the Iraq example
Wouldn't that be I'd like to take that up with you?
I think I'd say that in preference to I'd like to take you up on that.

CJ
"I'll take you up on that" in a response to an offer --- could this be paraphrased as "I believe you are honest with that offer, so I accept it"? Wouldn't the expression sometimes put the offerer off, or maybe offend him/her as you don't have to say "I believe you." He/she might think, "You don't believe me?" Or, do you just get tickled pink when you hear people say that after you made an offer?
Hi,

No, I don't see anything negative or offensive in the words. Much depends on the context, of course.

Clive
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