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And what are you doing if not assigning meanings to ... "The question is which is to be master, that's all."

You are confusing some categories. Yank is not idiosyncratic, it is a standard English word for the place, the people and the language.

You might want to tell the folks who publish the OED about this. They have it as a colloquial word for the people and as "an American car", but not as any sort of a word for the language or the place, except in "Yankland", which they mark as a "nonce word" with a single 1834 citation.
My meaning of English too is standard - not in aue, certainly, that is obvious, but in normal conversation between English people.

It would be interesting to see some stats that back up the assertion that English people don't consider that what Americans speak is a variety of English.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >Voting in the House of
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >Representatives is done by means of aPalo Alto, CA 94304 >little plastic card with a magnetic
You are confusing some categories. Yank is not idiosyncratic, it is a standard English word for the place, the people and the language.

You might want to tell the folks who publish the OED about this. They have it as a colloquial word ... the language or the place, except in "Yankland", which they mark as a "nonce word" with a single 1834 citation.

Yes, we covered that and I pointed to the evidence of Usenet and the Web showing the word to be in wide current usage. It's true that some English people will tend not to say 'Yank', when in the company of a yank out of some sort of delicacy, so yanks might get the impression that the word isn't generally used.
My meaning of English too is standard - not in aue, certainly, that is obvious, but in normal conversation between English people.

It would be interesting to see some stats that back up the assertion that English people don't consider that what Americans speak is a variety of English.

I'm not quite sure where you'd expect to find statistics covering this - unless somebody has carried out surveys on the matter. The evidence is more likely to come from language - even the old term 'Americanism', from 1781, gives you a strong lead to current views.

Who does vote for these dishonest shitheads? Who among us can be happy and proud of having all this innocent blood on our hands? Who are these swine? These flag-sucking half-wits who get fleeced and fooled by stupid little rich kids like George Bush?
They are the same ones who wanted to have Muhammad Ali locked up for refusing to kill gooks. the speak for all that is cruel and stupid and vicious in the American character. They are the racists and hate mongers among us - they are the Klu Kux Klan. I *** down the throats of these Nazis. - Hunter S. Thompson in 'Kingdom of Fear'
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Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I distinctly recall your saying that you were going away.

When?
Izzy
I distinctly recall your saying that you were going away.

Indeed you did (what a good memory you have for some things!), the same day you divined my divinity actually.
I shall, when I decide that I've completed what I wished to do. As I explained, I am just doing minor mopping up now.

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You might want to tell the folks who publish the ... mark as a "nonce word" with a single 1834 citation.

Yes, we covered that and I pointed to the evidence of Usenet and the Web showing the word to be in wide current usage.

1070 non-American google cites for "yankland" is a bit weak as evidencegoes. And many of the 3360 "yankland" items turned up by google groups were signed by one Peter H.M. Brooks.
I'm not quite sure where you'd expect to find statistics covering this - unless somebody has carried out surveys on the matter.

The advice "put up or shut up" (an Americanism?) comes to mind.
The evidence is more likely to come from language - even the old term 'Americanism', from 1781, gives you a strong lead to current views.

J.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Yes, we covered that and I pointed to the evidence of Usenet and the Web showing the word to be in wide current usage.

1070 non-American google cites for "yankland" is a bit weak as evidence goes.

I can't agree. The claim, that you see above, that it was a nonce word in 1834 and never heard of since is blown out of the water by so many references. Whether you consider it 'weak' evidence for widespread use would depend on where all these various usages were - as you say, if they were all in the same place then that would be weak.

'When I use a word,' Humpty Dumpty said ina rather scornful tojne, 'it means just what I choose it so mean - neither more nor less' - Alice in Wonderland, Lewis Carrol
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