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If I had given any impression of infallibility, then, yes, it might have meant that. Since I hadn't, it didn't.

You aren't in a position to say that, Peter. You are in a position to say that you hadn't intended ... somebody that you had no intention of offending. You tried to be funny but they were impressed by your racism.

I don't mean to imply anything about anyone's characteristics, but every time I read Peter's name as he shows it, I can't help but think of his middle initials as meaning "His Majesty".
I mean, every time! That's just me, I'm sure.
(RJV here's a comma ",". You may put it after the first "but" in my first sentence. I didn't have the heart to do it.)
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
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M. J. Powell filted:
There is also Echolalia, where the sufferer repeats the last few words of the last speaker before replying. My boss suffered from that. It was quite disconcerting at first. I didn't discover the name for it until I had retired, years later.

My mother's next-door neighbor has that...Mom interprets it as a sign of feeblemindedness, despite my attempts to explain the phenomenon to her..

And yes, it can certainly be annoying...for that reason, my least favorite member of Our Gang (aka "The Little Rascals") is Dorothy Borba..r
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You're thinking of glossolalia, not English, that's the one with ... euphemisms - rather more control than Yank in that respect.

There is also Echolalia, where the sufferer repeats the last few words of the last speaker before replying. My boss suffered from that. It was quite disconcerting at first. I didn't discover the name for it until I had retired, years later.

Yes, I think that that does indeed also show a lack of control - total if there is no control over the number of words repeated each time.

"Me! not at all," replied Mr. Knightley, rather displeased; "I do not want to think ill of him. I should be as ready to acknowledge his merits as any other man; but I hear of none, except what are merely personal; that he is well-grown and good-looking, with smooth, plausible manners." Emma, Jane Austen
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(one newsgroup dropped) On the contrary, legal jargon is among the most formalized forms of English. >

It's a mistake to confuse formalism with literacy. Consider autism and you'll understand.
Lawyers hide behind their jargon to avoid thought, either because they find it difficult or because they aren't up to it at all. There is no reason why law shouldn't be conducted using plain English, apart from the fact that it requires intelligence and a reasonable level of literacy to express things precisely and unambiguously in it.

When people ask me what I've got against pictures, I can only reply, 'What have you got against the well'- Quinten Crisp, Resident Alien

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M. J. Powell filted:

There is also Echolalia, where the sufferer repeats the last ... the name for it until I had retired, years later.

My mother's next-door neighbor has that...Mom interprets it as a sign of feeblemindedness, despite my attempts to explain the phenomenon to her..

What makes you sure that it isn't? It is apparently common in autism, Asperger's syndrome, Down syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome and Williams syndrome, but not Hall-Hitner syndrome. Tourette's famous 1885 paper mentions both coprolalia and echolalia as symptoms, along with the other motor incoordination.
There isn't much evidence of it being associated with any Sharpest-tool-in-the-box type syndromes.
Not that I'm saying all sufferers of Asperger's syndrome aren't clever, far from it, but exhibiting echolalia isn't quite such a good thing as you can see from the problems that lead to it.

I do not know as much as god, but I know as much as god did at my age - unnamed mathematician quoted by Milton Shulman
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Thank you, I always like corrections to my signatures, it indicates that somebody reads them.

Then you'll undoubtedly be pleased when I point out that the sig in one of your earlier posts in this thread has misidentified Quentin Crisp as "Quinten" Crisp.
Thank you, I always like corrections to my signatures, it indicates that somebody reads them.

Then you'll undoubtedly be pleased when I point out that the sig in one of your earlier posts in this thread has misidentified Quentin Crisp as "Quinten" Crisp.

Remarkably well-balanced person.
(We a couple, not royal "We" travelled from Colchester to Cambridge c.1984 to see his one-many show/discourse. Good stuff.)

Cheers, Harvey
Canada for 30 years; S England since 1982.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
M. J. Powell filted:

There is also Echolalia, where the sufferer repeats the last ... the name for it until I had retired, years later.

My mother's next-door neighbor has that...Mom interprets it as a sign of feeblemindedness, despite my attempts to explain the phenomenon to her.. And yes, it can certainly be annoying...for that reason, my least favorite member of Our Gang (aka "The Little Rascals") is Dorothy Borba..r

My boss was an ex-fighter pilot. He suffered from epilepsy. (Petite mal). I don't know if there is a connection.
Mike
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Thank you, I always like corrections to my signatures, it indicates that somebody reads them.

Then you'll undoubtedly be pleased when I point out that the sig in one of your earlier posts in this thread has misidentified Quentin Crisp as "Quinten" Crisp.

Quentin Crisp always make me think of Duncan Donut.

Matti
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