A year or so ago, someone asked me about rap music and whether I had a favorite hip-hop song at the moment. I told her "I'M FEELING LUDACRIS RIGHT NOW". Comments?
 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 11
A year or so ago, someone asked me about rap music and whether I had a favorite hip-hop song at the moment. I told her "I'M FEELING LUDACRIS RIGHT NOW". Comments?

You are Bun Mui and I claim a million dollars.

Rob L.
[nq:1]A year or so ago, someone asked me about rap music and whether I had a favorite hip-hop song at the moment. I told her "I'M FEELING LUDACRIS RIGHT NOW". Comments?
"Joey, Joey
King of the streets, child of clay."
Bob Dylan
Comments?

Ross Howard
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
[nq:1]A year or so ago, someone asked me about rap music and whether I had a favorite hip-hop song at the moment. I told her "I'M FEELING LUDACRIS RIGHT NOW". Comments?
I hope you didn't feel her in public. Both Ludacris and the other chick might resent it, and you could get arrested, Mr. Stinky-Fingers.

Reinhold (Rey) Aman
A year or so ago, someone asked me about rap music and whether I had a favorite hip-hop song at the moment. I told her "I'M FEELING LUDACRIS RIGHT NOW". Comments?

It's hard to pinpoint, but I'd guess that transitive "feel" meaning "to like, enjoy, feel a connection with (a song, a person, etc.)" dates to mid-'90s hiphop lingo. It's a stative verb but AFAIK almost always takes the progressive/habitual aspect ("be feeling X"). The object of the verb is often simply "it" with no clear antecedent (as in Jay-Z's
1996 song "Feelin' It"). Cf. the new hiphop-ish McDonald's advertisingslogan, "I'm lovin' it".
I'd guess that transitive "feel" meaning "to like, enjoy, feel a connection with (a song, a person, etc.)" dates to ... The object of the verb is often simply "it" with no clear antecedent (as in Jay-Z's 1996 song "Feelin' It").

But 1996 is too late for its first hiphop appearance: Marky Mark & The Funky Bunch's "Good Vibrations," released in 1991, urges us to "Feel it! feel it! Feel the vibration" (punctuation added), with "feel" of course pronounced about the way most of us say "fill." Is that a Jerseyism?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I'd guess that transitive "feel" meaning "to like, enjoy, feel ... no clear antecedent (as in Jay-Z's 1996 song "Feelin' It").

But 1996 is too late for its first hiphop appearance: Marky Mark & The Funky Bunch's "Good Vibrations," released in 1991, urges us to "Feel it! feel it! Feel the vibration" (punctuation added)

I'd argue that the two usages are distinct. Marky Mark (né Wahlberg) exhorts the listener to "feel it", where "it" has a clear referent, "the vibration". That's just your run-of-the-mill transitive "feel" ('to sense, be aware of, be affected by'). But Jay-Z raps, "I'm feelin' it... I know you're feelin' it" (no referent given for "it"), where "feelin' it" is used to express an abstract state of enjoyment. It's comparable to a previous generation's "dig it" (can you dig it?), but using the progressive aspect (inflected "be" + V-ing) that stative verbs can take in AAVE hence "I'm diggin'/feelin'/lovin' it".
with "feel" of course pronounced about the way most of us say "fill." Is that a Jerseyism?

Wha? Mark Wahlberg's from Boston. In Labov's survey, the merger of /i/ and /I/ before /l/ was found mostly in the South, with scattered examples in the West and North Midland:
http://www.ling.upenn.edu/phono atlas/maps/Map4.html http://www.ling.upenn.edu/phono atlas/maps/Map6.html

But for kids coming of age in the '80s like Wahlberg, I think the model was rilly Southern Californian.
)

with "feel" of course pronounced about the way most of us say "fill." Is that a Jerseyism?

Wha? Mark Wahlberg's from Boston.

He's performing in a rappish dialect.
In Labov's survey, the merger of /i/ and /I/ before /l/ was found mostly in the South, with scattered examples in the West and North Midland.

The merger I have in mind doesn't register in the Southern dialects I know (but then I haven't heard them all). It seems to go in tandem with the merger that results in where most of us have . CNBC has several announcers for whom is almost and is almost , and its studio is in New Jersey, so I was wondering if those announcers were local folk, or at least Easterners.
Yes, CNBC broadcasts from Fort Lee and MSNBC from Secaucus, but these are national networks so you probably won't hear "local folk". These days you'd be hard-pressed to hear a Jersey accent even on WOR of Secaucus, a local station that for a while was a cable "superstation" back in the day they used the local pronunciation of ('si,[email protected]) but now use the standard ([email protected]'[email protected]).
Both mergers you mention (feel-fill and tail-tell) are typical of certain regions of the South, particularly western North Carolina (the Raleigh-Durham area) and west Texas. But Labov's maps show that these are both ongoing mergers in various other parts of the country, including the North Midland and the West Coast:
http://www.ling.upenn.edu/phono atlas/maps/Map4.html http://www.ling.upenn.edu/phono atlas/maps/Map7.html

As these mergers are not at all typical of the Northeast, I'm guessing that both Mark W. and CNBC's broadcasters are most likely influenced by West Coast phonological shifts.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more