I'm engaged in a discussion about using "perk" as a short form of "perquisite," as in the sentence, "Among other perks of the job, Bob had use of the company jet on weekends." I maintain that the proper form is "perq" instead of "perk," while my correspondent maintains that it cannot be "perq" because English words don't end in *q*. Unfortunately, I can't find anything to support my argument other than a few appearances of the "perq" spelling in the archives of this group (and several gazillion google references to a defunct workstation).

Your input is welcome.
-30-
rex ("So long, Nimrod!")
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I'm engaged in a discussion about using "perk" as a short form of "perquisite," as in the sentence, "Among other ... in the archives of this group (and several gazillion google references to a defunct workstation). Your input is welcome. -30-

Your use of "-30-" indicates that you are newspaper writer who is providing an indication of where your copy ends. If so, your newspaper has a style format that should be followed. I would doubt if a newspaper includes a slang shortening of a word in their style book.
If you are using the slang shortening in personal writing, then use the version that your reader is most familiar with. If your reader thinks "perk" is the correct version, use it. "Proper" is what expresses the term so that the reader understands.

If you don't know what your reader is familiar with, then spell out the entire word or use a substitute word like "benefits".

For anyone that isn't familiar with "-30-", when I worked for a newspaper and submitted copy, I was required to submit the material on yellow paper with the typing double-spaced. The last line was -30- to indicate the end of the copy so the editor would know that no pages were missing. I still use yellow paper for drafts.
"rex" (Email Removed) schrieb im Newsbeitrag
I'm engaged in a discussion about using "perk" as a short form of "perquisite," as in the sentence, "Among other ... appearances of the "perq" spelling in the archives of this group (and several gazillion google references to a defunct workstation).

I've only ever seen it as "perk", which suggests that your correspondent has the better argument. All the dictionaries I've consulted have "perk", but not "perq".
There are some other abbreviations that are not spelt the way you'd expect, although they're pretty rare. For example, "refrigerator" can be abbreviated to "fridge", which has a bonus "d" thrown in. After all, what is a "frige"?

However, you can take solace in the fact that there are a few words in the English language that end in Q, although most of them are very obscure and are loan words from other languages. There is, for example, an Eskimo people called the Inupiaq. "Rencq" is an obsolete spelling of "rank", and "Kazakh" can also be written "Qazaq". But there is one word that ends in Q with which everyone is familiar, especially at the moment: I am referring, of course, to Iraq.
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Your input is welcome. -30-

Your use of "-30-" indicates that you are newspaper writer whois providing an indication of where your copy ends. ... end of the copy so the editorwould know that no pages were missing. I still use yellow paper for drafts.

We used "newsprint." "End rolls" of unused newsprint paper were cut into 8.5 x 11-inch sheets (I think that was the size) every once in a while; the supply was for everyone to use for articles and ads submitted to the composing room. Larger sizes were also cut, for use as layout paper as needed.)
As for "-30-":
One of our writers used that, but most used the following indicators...
x = end of sentence. (Seldom used, except for the occasional handwritten material.)
xx = end of paragraph. (Ditto, plus for any ambiguous situations.)
xxx = end of copy. (Used almost always.)
(Note that x, xx, xxx = 10, 20, 30.)
I still use the 'x' system in just about everything I write out by hand. Old habits die hard.
Maria Conlon
OBediting: I've edited this post a few times for clarity. It may now
contain some inexplicable errors. (Btw, I wonder how many newspapers use actual human proofreaders these days. My guess: few.)
rex wrote on 12 May 2004:
I'm engaged in a discussion about using "perk" as a short form of "perquisite," as in the sentence, "Among other ... appearances of the "perq" spelling in the archives of this group (and several gazillion google references to a defunct workstation).

I found a lot of hits for "perqs", like this one for a Morgan Stanley Pressroom page http://tinyurl.com/2y3pe :
(quote)
8% Reset PERQS due October 30, 2002 Mandatorily Exchangeable for Shares of Common Stock of Yahoo! Inc.
9% Reset PERQS due December 30, 2002 Mandatorily Exchangeable for Shares of Common Stock of Xilinx, Inc.

20.35% PERQS due January 15, 2003 Mandatorily Exchangeable for Sharesof Common Stock of Siebel Systems, Inc.
8% Reset PERQS due February 28, 2003 Mandatorily Exchangeable for American Depositary Receipts Representing Ordinary Shares of Nokia Corporation (The amendments will also affect an acceleration event triggered by delisting of the ADRs.)
(/quote)
and this one:
Perqs of a Career in Dairy Programs
Your browser does not support script, ...
http://www.ams.usda.gov/dairy/o r/perks.htm
which says this on the Web page:
(quote)
Perks of a Career in Dairy
Perks, or perquisites, are defined as privileges or gains incidental to regular salary or wages. Here are just a few perks you might enjoy in the Dairy Programs workplace:
(/quote)
You lose and your correspondent wins.

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I'm engaged in a discussion about using "perk" as a short formof "perquisite," as in the sentence, "Among other perks ... spelling in the archives of this group (and several gazillion google references to a defunct workstation). Your input is welcome.

The first time I heard "perk," I misunderstood it to be "pert." I figured it stood for "pertinent" as in a pertinent benefit of the job. (Context made it plain that a benefit or "extra" was meant. I could not find anything in the dictionary; "perk" never occurred to me that was what coffee did, right?) I actually typed it as "pert" in a speech I was writing for someone. Fortunately, the person giving the speech knew it should be "perk," and new what "perk" stood for. This was in the mid-1960s.

Live and learn, eh?
Maria Conlon
The older I grow the more I distrust the familiar doctrine that age brings wisdom. (H. L. Mencken)
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rewboss filted:
I'm engaged in a discussion about using "perk" as a ... group (and several gazillion google references to a defunct workstation).

I've only ever seen it as "perk", which suggests that your correspondent has the better argument. All the dictionaries I've ... example, "refrigerator" can be abbreviated to "fridge", which has a bonus "d" thrown in. After all, what is a "frige"?

...and "frig" is more than merely misleading...doesn't mean I haven't seen it abbreviated thus..
Another example that might be pertinent considering the apparent profession of our correspondent is "fax"...the same logic that derives the spelling "perq" would insist it should be "facs"..
(My mother works at FACS, but that's short for something else entirely; I think the "F" and "C" are for "federated" and "credit" respectively, but that's just a guess)..r
There are some other abbreviations that are not spelt the way you'dexpect, although they're pretty rare. For example, "refrigerator" can be abbreviated to "fridge", which has a bonus "d" thrown in. After all, what is a "frige"?

Yes, I too had always thought "fridge" was an abbreviation for "refrigerator". Recently, however, I was reading a novel written in the 1930s (Chandler, perhaps?) where the author used "frigidaire" as a generic term for "refrigerator". Reading that, I remember my grandparents used to do the same. I suppose it's much the same as using "hoover" to mean all "vacuum cleaners", "band aids" for "adhesive bandages", "scotch tape" for "cellophane tape", and so on. Could it be that "fridge" is after all a contraction of "frigidaire" rather than "refrigerator"?
Yes, I too had always thought "fridge" was an abbreviation for "refrigerator". Recently, however, I was reading a novelwritten in ... for "cellophane tape", and so on. Could it be that "fridge" isafter all a contraction of "frigidaire" rather than "refrigerator"?

It's always been my impression that it could be either. I don't know if there's a way to find out for sure if it was one or the other that is, if there was a single source for the abbreviated version. I suppose, though, that if there's a proven use of "fridge" before the Frigidaire was manufactured (or advertised), then we'd know.
And note: the "frig" in refrigerator is pronounced the same as the "fridg" in Frigidaire. And in neither word does "fridge" appear as "fridge."
Maria Conlon
I remember, though dimly, having an ice box before the refrigerator. (Late 1940s/early 1950s.) And the neighborhood was served by an iceman. People of my age and older still refer to the "fridge" as an "ice box" at times.
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