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I have to ( charge / ??? ) my debit card with 30 dollars in order to prevent it from running out of money.

Is there any verb that can be replaced for "charge"? Thank you.
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AnonymousI have to ( charge / ??? ) my debit card with 30 dollars in order to prevent it from running out of money.

Is there any verb that can be replaced for "charge"? Thank you.

I'm not sure what the situation is. Can you explain it more?
I think that you are speaking of a cash card (prepaid credit card) rather than a debit card (check card)-- the latter automatically deducts charges from your bank account. There may be some confusion in terms, however.

I need a little help here-- the on-line definitions of all these cards have confused me at least...

In any case, 'charge' is the only verb that comes to mind at the moment. 'Deposit additional funds to'?
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My debit card is running out of money.
This means I have to charge the card with money.

I would like to ask you if there is any other verb for the context.
You need to deposit money in the account that the debit card draws from.

-- Sorry, I couldn't see the whole thread when I replied. I didn't mean to duplicate. --
Is there any verb that can be replaced for "charge"?
No, and "charge" doesn't work either. You can't "charge a card". You deposit funds into your account -- the account that the debit card is linked to.

I have to add $30 to my account, or I won't be able to use my debit card.

CJ
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CalifJim
Is there any verb that can be replaced for "charge"?
No, and "charge" doesn't work either. You can't "charge a card". You deposit funds into your account -- the account that the debit card is linked to.

I have to add $30 to my account, or I won't be able to use my debit card.

CJ

I think the poster is using 'charge' as in to charge batteries, fill them up. Emotion: big smile
Yes, that was what I was thinking also. Here in Japan we have a popular transportation card. You put the card into a ticket machine, then put 1000, 3000, etc yen into the machine, and the card is charged with that amount of money. You can then use it board trains and buses until the money runs out, and you have to recharge the card (or some other verb).
I think the poster is using 'charge' as in to charge batteries
Yes, indeed. It was a good try, but no cigar. "Thanks for playing!"

CJ
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