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Look at the example :

—> Fed received the invitation. Yet, he didn’t attend the party.


if I added (in spite of)

Is it right to say :

  • In spite of receiving the invitation, he didn't attend the party
  • In spite of being received the invitation, Fed didn't attend the part

Or both are incorrect

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miradorIn spite of receiving the invitation, he didn't attend the party.

Correct.

miradorIn spite of being received the invitation, Fed didn't attend the party.

Wrong, the invitation was received, not Fred, who was the receiver!

I would say:

In spite of receiving an invitation, Fred decided/chose not to attend the party.

Or:

Fred received an invitation; however, he didn’t attend the party.

The word "spite" carries a connotation of doing something on purpose.

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The most natural way is:

Fred did not attend the party, even though he was invited.
Fred did not attend the party, even though he got an invite..

"In spite of" does not work. Here are some examples:

In spite of the COVID-19 pandemic, many people are going to bars where they drink, dance and hang out with complete strangers.
In spite of the forecast for severe thunderstorms, we drove to the beach with our picnic basket packed with delicious food.
In spite of the fact that his ex-girlfriend was best friends of the host and that he was pointedly not invited, Fred went to the party anyway.
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Comments  
mirador

Look at the example :

—> Fed received the invitation. Yet, he didn’t attend the party.


if I added (in spite of)

Is it right to say :

  • In spite of receiving the invitation, he didn't attend the party
  • In spite of being received the invitation, Fed didn't attend the part

Or both are incorrect,No, only the one in blue.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

Thanks for explaining, Just one thing

Is this sentence correct?


In spite of being received, the invitation was declined.

miradorIn spite of being received, the invitation was declined.

It's grammatical if you're just concerned with structure, but it's not natural English.

learners always have the urge to learn and use new words and phrases into their sentential context that they can relate to more easily, as in this invitation example. That's why I always try to discuss the sentence with a sentential context for contrast. Learners must understand, when wrong words or phrases are constructed in a sentence, it will for sure sound awkward and border-line ungrammatical. Actually, I was hesitant in using this idiom " in spite of" in this context. Don't worry about the finesse. It will come later. For now, try to keep everything in the grammatical boundaries. This is an example I would recommend for this idiom. In spite of multiple warnings, from his family, he still went to the party. Now he is COVID positive.

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