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Can we put this into imperative?

I hope that they are over the age 14.

“They be over the age 14”?

Or, "Let they be over the age 14"?

Or, I hope that she is beautiful.

“She be beautiful”?

In Korean language we have an imperative construction to say this. I’d like to know how we can put this in English.

I know that the notion of imperative in this context is somewhat unthinkable logically, but just to find out how it is in English.

And I wish someone will take interest in this thread of mine:

http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/HaveHadDone/qqlvk/post.htm
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pructus
Can we put this into imperative?
I hope that they are over the age 14.
“They be over the age 14”?
Or, "Let they be over the age 14"?
Or, I hope that she is beautiful.
“She be beautiful”?
It is not logical to command someone to be a certain age, or to change their looks. That is an impossible request.

It is also not common to command someone to feel something, to know something or to hope something. So the imperative is not commonly used with verbs of this type. I have noted some exceptions below.

The imperative is always formed from the bare infinitive, with the implied subject "you."

The imperative be is used in the definition of behaving or acting, eg.

Be good.

Be beautiful. (Act and think as though you were beautiful.)

Be proud of yourself.

The imperative know is used in the definition of "to reflect" or "to study."

Know thyself. (Reflect on who and what you are.)

Know that I love you. (Be aware that I love you.)

The imperatives of feeling verbs are used in words of wisdom:

Fear the worst, but hope for the best. (An adage.)
Comments  
I see....

After some more thought, I realized that what is being expressed in the imperative in Korean was actually some kind of wish.

Many thanks for the example sentences!!